Top 11 Reasons Why College Students Dropout: Don’t Let it Happen to You Reply

Students drop out for a number of reasons. A lot of time it has to do with money, time, or an unexpected emergency where they become unable to keep attending college or not go in the first place. Here are the top reasons why students drop out of college and what you can do to avoid the pitfalls.

  1. School costs too much

One of the biggests reasons that students drop out of college is because of the lack of funds to keep going. Many students take out school loans, but that isn’t always enough. Between the costs of classes, books, rent, and just trying to survive, students are more and more learning that while worth it in the long run, the cost of education is high. Check with your school’s financial aid office and search online for scholarships and help paying for tuition.

  1. Needed to get a full time job

This goes along with the cost of education. A lot of students find that they need to get a full time job in order to pay their bills, which cuts into being able to attend classes. However, a lot of people find that if they can take even one class a semester it will help them to lighten the load and complete their degree. Graduating from college is a long term commitment, and there is nothing wrong with taking longer if that is what you need to do.

  1. Family issues

Family can be very helpful while going to college, but for a lot of students family can be a huge stressor and burden on their life. Especially if a family emergency happens, you might have to take time off from school. Keep in mind that professors are generally understanding of student’s situations, so often if you let them know of your situation, you can work out a plan to finish your coursework on your own time. Your teachers want to see you succeed.

  1. Too much stress

Going to college is stressful, there is no doubt about it. If you are just graduating high school, then the amount of coursework mixed with the personal life and new sense of independence will get to you. But, the important part is that you learn how to cope and find ways to study. It is OK to have fun, but passing your classes is essential to your success.

  1. Not sure of major

Many students go into college with their major undeclared, which is completely fine. However, as you get farther along in college, you are going to have to eventually declare a major. Don’t let this stress you out so much that you end up dropping out of college over it. Keep taking classes, meet with your professors and advisors, and find something that you are passionate about.

  1. No need to complete a full degree

A lot of students go to college just to obtain the knowledge they need to succeed, and sometimes you don’t need a full degree to succeed in life. Students who need a little bit of education in order to obtain a leg up in their career can find a lot of resources at college.

  1. Unprepared for the work load

Attributing to their overall stress, students who graduate high school and go straight into college find that the workload is more than they expected. Prepare to spend more time on your classes than you did before, but don’t forget to take some time to relax and recharge your brain too.

  1. Personal emergency

Personal emergencies are stressful enough when you are out of college. If something happens where you aren’t able to go to class and finish your homework, speak with your professors so that you can make other plans to finish your coursework, take tests, and make up the time missed in the classroom. As stated above, teachers want to see you succeed.

  1. The college atmosphere wasn’t the right fit

Some people just don’t mesh well with the traditional college atmosphere. And that is OK. If you consider yourself one of these types of people, consider the other alternatives to traditional education. You might find that an online program is a better with for your lifestyle. Or, consider taking classes part time so that you can work while you go to college.

  1. Too much fun outside of class

Don’t let personal freedom take control of your entire life. It is fine to have fun, meet new people, and enjoy your life in college, just be sure to take time to actually study so that you can pass your classes.

  1. Lack of advising

Lack of advising is often a problem in many colleges. A lot of the problem too is students don’t take the time to meet with advisors when they need it the most — don’t let this be you. Meet with your advisors and plan out your goals for college. And if they don’t help you, go to your college professors, mentors, parents, friends, and anybody else that will help you reduce the stress of how to obtain your personal and professional goals.

Keep in mind that just because you drop out of college, it doesn’t mean you can’t go back later to finish. More and more students are taking classes part time or dropping out for a semester and going back later. Graduating college is a very important aspect to being successful, and it is never too late to finish your degree. Time goes by fast, so know that you can finish one class a semester if you have to to lighten the load. Keep in mind these top reasons why most college students drop out to help safeguard yourself from not being able to complete your degree.  

High School Juniors Will Get to Take the SAT for Free Reply

New York City public schools have taken a big leap in helping students pay for standardized testing and ease the burden of the college application process. The New York Department of Education has announced an initiative coined SAT School Day that will allow high school juniors to take the SAT for free starting in the spring of 2016.

By waiving the registration charge of around $54.50, free testing will go a long way in helping students get into college. Though it was intended to help low-income families have an equal chance of going to college, all students, no matter their income, will be able to take the test free-of-charge.  

Schools will also be scheduling SAT test-taking time during the school day so that students won’t have to take time out of their weekends, which is how it is typically done now. High schools won’t make the test mandatory, but this should help improve test participation.

More than anything, this is part of New York State’s educational plan to increase the number of students applying to college after high school graduation. The hope is that taking the SAT will become a regular part of a student’s high school atmosphere. Kids take enough standardized tests as it is, but the SAT has become a requirement for admittance into most major colleges and universities across the nation.  

High School sophomores and juniors were given free access to take the PSATs back in 2007 as a step towards ensuring student success. On the same day sophomores take the PSAT, juniors will have the option to take the SAT.

Six thousand students in 40 NYC public schools participated in the SAT School Day pilot program in the spring of 2015, and another 52 schools and 9,000 students will be added to the program. The citywide implementation of the SAT School Day program will happen in the Spring of 2017.

Class Participation in the American Classroom Reply

You might think that perfect scores on tests, homework and projects might be all you need to do well in a university class in the USA, but you’d be wrong and the reason will probably surprise you: you have to participate in class.

Having to participate in class is something that always surprises new international students when they come to the USA.

“The biggest surprise is U.S. education. It’s very strict and you have to ask instructors questions if you don’t understand. You have to participate in class,” said Pirakorn Iamcharernying, from Thailand, who studied in the Intensive English Program at the University of San Francisco in California.

Your first day of class, you will be give a syllabus. Reading through the pages that outline the grading criteria and student expectations the professor has of you, you will see a word that will become very familiar to you while studying in the U.S.: participation.

What exactly is “class participation?” Each professor will have their own definition of student participation and they may even describe it in great detail in the syllabus for their class. Professors will grade on the frequency and quality of your participation in class. Generally, class participation is contributing to class lectures, either with comment or questions, volunteering answers to questions directed at the class and being attentive.

Why is class participation important? The first, most obvious answer is to make sure you’re actually there! You can’t participate in class if you’re not present. Another reason is to make sure you’re listening and absorbing the material discussed in the lecture. Having to answer questions about what is being discussed keeps you attentive. And finally, participation challenges you to understand the concepts and think through them critically.

This is a foundational concept in the U.S. classroom and it is part of the style of teaching here in the states. In the United States, the education system is designed to go beyond memorization. Obviously, you must know the material, but the application of concepts is much more important. There is a reason individuality is an integral part of American culture: it encourages ingenuity. Professors want you to not only hear what they’re saying, but they want you to understand what they’re teaching. You may even be asked to debate with your professor! The idea of arguing with your professor can be very uncomfortable and your first instinct may be that it’s disrespectful. After all, it may be extremely disrespectful in your home country. But rest assured, if you speak respectfully, you probably would not offend your professor.

“I was very surprised when students and the professor argued about some issues in the class. I think this is very good for students to improve critical thinking ability,“ explains Yujeong Moon from South Korea who studied English and business at Angelo State University.

Since an American style classroom and the education system will be all new to you, I suggest observing how American students participate in class and how their contributions are received. Some professors might have a more casual style and allow for open commentary in the class. Other professors may require that you raise your hand and wait to be called upon. Remember, you can always ask your professor for clarification too.

Speaking up in class or taking a chance and answering a question—in front of people, no less—can be really intimidating, especially for an international student and if English is not your first language. But you must try if you’re going to be successful in your studies and the more you do it, the more comfortable you’ll be.

Jennifer Privette is the Editor and Assistant Publish of Study in the USA magazines and She has a bachelor’s degree in journalism from Seattle University.

All views and opinions of guest authors are theirs alone and are not representative of the views of or its parent company Nelnet.

Peterson’s to Release ACT Prep Guide in March 2016 Reply

Guide to Mastering the ACTPeterson’s ACT® Prep Guide: The Ultimate Guide to Mastering the ACT is the latest installment in Peterson’s very successful history of publishing leading ACT test prep. Peterson’s published ACT titles have sold more than one million copies over the past five years and have been the preeminent ACT resources on the market.

“Peterson’s is excited to announce that the story continues with the latest addition to our product line, the Peterson’s ACT® Prep Guide: The Ultimate Guide to Mastering the ACT,” says Jeffrey Noordhoek, Nelnet CEO. “Peterson’s published the official ACT test preparation guide for over a decade and we know how and where students prepare for their academic future. We remain committed to publishing resources with the highest standards to ensure accurate, dependable, high-quality content to help students prepare for the best score possible.”

The ACT® Prep Guide offers students exactly what they need to prepare with confidence for this important college admission test, including: a full-length diagnostic test to evaluate a student’s strengths and weaknesses, six practice tests – four in print and two online – all with detailed answer explanations and in-depth review of all test sections, as well as strategies on how to raise test scores and feel at ease on test day.

For more information on this publication, see the full press release on PRWeb.

11 reasons why volunteering in college will make you successful Reply

Volunteering isn’t just good for the soul, it is also good to help build your resume when you are in college. One of the most important things for hiring managers when they are looking at your resume is the extra things you do to establish yourself as a successful person. Plus, unlike getting an internship, volunteering allows you to gain work experience on your own time without a large commitment. Whether you are a freshman or a senior, consider volunteering to help boost your chances of finding a job after graduation.

  1. Gain work experience

There is nothing more beneficial to have on your resume than work experience. Especially if you are volunteering for an organization that is in the same industry as your chosen career path, having work experience will show hiring managers that you know what you are doing and will be a valuable member to their team.

  1. Build your resume

How many times have you heard that is very important to build your resume before you graduate college? Degrees are becoming more and more common in the job market, and showing potential employers that you are a hard worker and care about your community through volunteering is essential for being successful in your job search.

  1. Help out your community

A great community creates better opportunities for everybody. By helping out your community, whether it be through volunteering with the homeless shelter, hospital, or other community events, you will gain a new appreciation for your community and be able to help out those in need.

  1. Learn to work as a team

Volunteering is all about working as a team. Working well with complete strangers is valuable to hiring managers and it will help you learn from other people’s strengths. Showing that you can work with others productively and efficiently is essential for the typical work environment. Take the opportunity of volunteering to learn about working with others and becoming a leader.

  1. Get scholarships

One of the things that organizations look at when awarding scholarships is how much applicants have volunteered. Scholarship organizations love applicants that show they care about their community and want to help. While volunteering a little bit is good, doing it over an extended period is even better. If you start volunteering in your freshman year of college, or even in high school, you will be able to get scholarships for higher amounts and from private and public organizations.

  1. Gain references

Good references are key when finding a job. By volunteering you can meet people in your industry that will give you a good reference when applying for full-time positions. Don’t be afraid to ask the mentors that you work under for a reference — most of them will be more than happy to help you become successful.

  1. Networking is essential

By volunteering you won’t just gain references, it will also give you the opportunity to gain contacts and network within your industry. This will help you find job opportunities that aren’t advertised and potentially give you a foot in the door. Networking. Networking. Networking. This is essential if you want to have a successful career.

  1. Prepare for graduate school

The graduate school admissions process is tough, especially when trying to get into high-ranking schools. Volunteering is a great way to separate yourself from the competition and show that you are dedicated to succeeding. Showing that you care about your community and can work as a team will help to show hiring managers that you are a well-rounded employee.

  1. Test out career opportunities

If you are unsure as to whether or not you want to work in a specific industry or not, volunteering is a great way to test out potential companies and job titles. Consider volunteering for a company that you want to work for to help you get a sense of the overall work environment and how well you work with your fellow employees.

  1. Gain perspective

With all of the great benefits for your future career that comes with volunteering, you will also gain a better perspective of the world around you. Seeing perspectives from your mentors, workmates, and those you help will give you a sense of accomplishment in what you do. Volunteering also helps you see the bigger picture within companies, your community, and the entire world.

  1. You will enjoy it

Believe it or not, the vast majority of people who volunteer enjoy it — and you will too. Take the opportunity to volunteer to learn about yourself and those around you and you might just find a career in something that you have passion in and love to do.

Starting Your First Year on Campus Reply

Time flies. Summer has gone by quick and now it is time to start getting ready to go off to college. It wasn’t that long ago that you were a lowly freshman in high school; learning the ropes, trying to find your classes and your locker, and figuring out how you fit in to this brand new situation. Now you’ve graduated, high school is behind you, and you are about to start out once again as a freshman in a new and strange place. For some, this is an exciting prospect. For others, it may be terrifying! For most of us, it’s a little of both. Many questions are likely running through your head. What should you expect? What will your dorm be like? Will your roommate be nice and easy to get along with?  What should you bring?

First you should expect that, like your freshman year in high school, it will probably take you a few weeks to familiarize yourself with the area and get accustomed to your new life as a college student. Try to relax and give yourself a break and allow yourself to be a freshman. You will get lost. You and the other freshmen will be easily recognizable on campus because you will likely have maps in your hands and a somewhat perplexed expression on your face as you begin to learn to navigate the place.

When you first get to college and get yourself settled in, take some time to explore the campus and your dorm. There will be rules for your dorm, make sure you read them and understand them. Remember your RA (Resident Assistant) is there to help you. The RA applied to that position because he or she wants to help you get settled in and happy in your new environment. Your RA is a resource that you should use! Wander around. Allow yourself to get lost and discover new places.

Most likely you will have a roommate. Many students headed to college worry that they will not get along with their roommate or that there will be potential issues or conflicts. This does not seem to be the case very often – most college roommates get along great and become good friends. Honest and open communication can prevent most conflicts before they even happen. Also, remember that this roommate is likely just for one year and if things aren’t going well, you’ll probably have the chance to make a change before the beginning of next year.

As far as what to bring with you, there are several suggested lists on the internet. Be sure to check your dorm’s rules before bringing things like microwaves, toaster ovens, coffee makers and the like, as some have fire regulations that prohibit such items. Bring mostly comfortable clothes and shoes to wear to class and a few more formal outfits for special events or interviews. Don’t forget to bring pillows, sheets, towels  washcloths. You will want a shower tote and slippers to wear to and from the shower. Bring things like photos to help remind you of home. We all have tons of electronics we bring with us (laptops, cell phones, tablets, etc) – don’t forget the chargers for these! Obviously bring some school supplies (paper, pencil, notebooks) for your first few days. It may be advisable to wait to see what you will need for your classes and buy supplies then, rather than buy a bunch of supplies to bring with you that you may not need.

The most important thing you can bring with you is your humor, your patience and your sense of adventure. Yes, your first few weeks at college will likely be stressful, they will also be exciting and fun. Don’t forget to enjoy yourself!

Don’t Procrastinate, Register to take the GRE 1

Register for the GRESo you’ve just started up school again (or you’re getting ready to). Summer is over and it is time to get back into the college routine. Getting registered and prepared for a new school year can be a crazy process. There are many things to do in a short period of time. You’ve received your financial aid package, bought your books, and are probably getting settled back into school life. Starting a new school year is stressful and full of activity, especially your senior year. Even though it may be difficult to add even one more thing to your busy schedule, you should take the time to schedule to take the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). It’s important because the sooner you register, the better.

The Revised General Test

You’ll take the GRE revised General Test as part of your preparation for graduate school. The test is a requirement for most graduate schools and business schools. The GRE test is one of the first steps you should take toward preparing for graduate school. You can take the test up to 5 times in a 12-month period, so by registering now, you’re giving yourself the opportunity to re-take the test if you are not satisfied with your results. If you take the test multiple times, you get to choose which test results you submit to graduate or business schools. Also, different schools have different deadlines when it comes to submitting the GRE during the application process. It’s best to take the test as soon as possible so that you are ready to submit your results as soon as your chosen grad school is ready to receive them.

Registering before Preparation

What if you’re not prepared to take the test yet, should you still register? Yes! Once you register, you’ll have access to test preparation software developed by the same people who develop the test itself. It’s one more test to prepare for, one more thing to study, but the sooner you start, the more successful you are liable to be.

Even if you are unsure that you will pursue a graduate degree, it’s still a good idea to take the test. Taking the test allows you to be prepared if and when you do decide to get a graduate degree. The last thing you want is to decide to apply for a graduate program only to find that you don’t have time to take the test before the school’s deadline. Your test scores are held for five years, so even if you decide to take a break before applying to graduate school, or decide not to go to graduate school but change your mind later, you can still submit these scores. It is always good to keep your options open. Be smart and be prepared.

Peterson’s Author Helps Students Achieve Their Education Goals Reply

Peterson’s is more than just information for students and teachers. Just last week, Justin Ross Muchnick, author of Peterson’s The Boarding School Survival Guide, awarded two students $1,000 scholarships for their essays, which he called “honest, thoughtful, and authentic.” The two winning incoming freshmen are Bob Moore from Louisville, KY, who will be attending McCallie School in Chattanooga, TN, and Elise Hogan from Sicklerville, NJ, who will be attending St. Andrews School in Middletown, DE. Students submitted essays on the reasons, desires, discoveries, etc. on why they want to attend boarding school. The applications came from all ends of the earth – Egypt, Iran, Canada, and across the U.S.

In June of 2014, Peterson’s released The Boarding School Survival Guide, written by students, for students. This guide was the idea of Peterson’s youngest author, Justin Muchnick – 16 at the time of publication – who personally navigated the difficult waters of selecting a boarding school. His book is designed to provide students insight from other students who attend or recently graduated from a boarding school.

The Boarding School Survival Guide includes 25 chapters that help students choose and navigate life at boarding school, including advice on campus visits, how to deal with homesickness, and finding a mentor. Justin reached out to boarding school students throughout the country. Chapter contributors include students at Andover, Exeter, Choate Hotchkiss, Deerfield, Hill, St. Paul’s, Lawrenceville, Thatcher, Cate, Taft, Tilton, Kent, South Kent, Webb, Hebron, Pomfret, Middlesex, THINK Global, Maine School of Science and Mathematics, Culver, and other boarding schools across the United States.

Congratulations to the winners of the scholarships, and to the Peterson’s publishing team, which works tirelessly to bring students all the information they need to have a successful college career.


You can read the full story as a press release here.

See The Boarding School Survival Guide and Peterson’s other titles at

How to Organize Your Summer Test Prep Reply

The summertime is upon us! While every high school student deserves some rest and relaxation, it’s also the perfect time to kick your SAT and ACT prep into gear. With no academic obligations on your plate and a long runway to improve your testing performance, now is the time to start setting yourself up for college success. In this brief guide, I’ll show you exactly how to make the most of your summer and walk into the fall ready to knock these tests out of the park.

Summer Prep Tip #1: Cancel the Cramming and Covet Consistency

The most underrated ingredient in any successful test prep program is long-term effort. You can’t cram for the SAT and the ACT – they test large banks of information applied in unique ways, and they test process more than they test knowledge. If you give your brain the time to develop thick, well-developed pathways for these processes and facts, you’ll have an incredibly easy time tackling these exams.

With that in mind, your focus should be on small bits of steady, everyday effort. If you can put in 20-45 minutes a day throughout the summer, you won’t just be making things easier on yourself – you’ll also be using your brain the way it’s meant to be used. Don’t put off your prep and then try to get in eight hours on a Sunday – instead, try to focus on small, consistent study sessions on a daily basis, and feel free to split them up! If you can do twenty minutes in the morning and twenty minutes in the afternoon, you’ll be in amazing shape.

With that in mind, make sure to pick a program that allows you to study on your own schedule! Most SAT and ACT classes and tutors have somewhat restrictive scheduling limitations, which won’t allow you to optimize your summer prep. Instead, find a way to study that allows you to do small bits of work on your schedule, whenever you have the time.

Summer Prep Tip #2: Make Sure You’re Studying for the Right Test

Things in the testing world have gone topsy turvy. The PSAT is now in the New SAT format starting this fall, the SAT is going to switch in March of 2016, and the most recent versions of the current SAT have had their fair share of problems over the last few months. Fortunately for you, this makes life easier, not harder.

As far as I’m concerned, your best bet is to pursue one of these two paths:

  1. Study for the ACT, which will kill two birds with one stone. Because the New SAT is almost identical to the current ACT, by studying for the ACT, you’ll be able to knock out the ACT, the New SAT, and the New PSAT (I guess that’s three birds…).
  2. If you vastly prefer the current version of the SAT to the ACT, you should study up and take it before it changes in March.

Summer Prep Tip #3: Pick a Flexible Program

Summertime is marked by totally unpredictable schedules. You never know where you’ll be, when, or for how long. With that in mind, it’s essential that you pick a program that works wherever you happen to be, and that doesn’t rely on a set-in-stone schedule. As we already discussed, consistency is key, so choosing a program that accommodates the flexibility of your summer schedule will be essential.

Classroom courses are the worst offenders. If you have to be in a specific place at a specific time week in and week out, you’re setting yourself up for disaster. If you work with a tutor, make sure that he or she can work with you online via Skype or video conferencing software, and be sure that he or she can work on different schedules throughout the summer.

The most flexible way to prep is usually through an online course (a reason why online SAT and ACT prep programs are rapidly increasing in popularity). As long as you have a laptop with you, you can prepare whenever you find the time and wherever you happen to be. All you’ll need is the discipline to log into the program after a day at the lake or the beach (sometimes, it’s easier to study before you’ve been out in the sun all day).

No Matter What, Starting Early is Essential

No matter which program you use, and no matter which test you decide to take, the best thing you can do for your performance is to start preparing today. The longer the runway you give yourself to prepare, the less work you have to do on a daily basis, the more breathing room you have, and the more effectively your brain will be able to retain information. Even if you only put in ten minutes a day, starting now will be the smartest decision you can possibly make!

Thanks so much for reading my guide! Have a great summer, and don’t hesitate to get in touch if you have any questions.

Anthony-James Green is a world-renowned SAT and ACT tutor with over 13,000 hours of experience teaching these tests, crafting curriculum, and training other tutors to teach their own students. Business Insider recently named Anthony: “America’s Top SAT Tutor

All views and opinions of guest authors are theirs alone and are not representative of the views of or its parent company Nelnet.

What’s Next After Graduation? Looking for Your First Job Reply

Congratulations, you’ve graduated from college! But now that you’ve gotten your diploma, what’s next?

Step one: Find a job.

If you haven’t found a job and you are already into the summer of your graduation, then it is time to update your resume, apply for a number of jobs that you qualify for, and prepare for the professional interviews that are to come.

When building your resume, be sure to research as much as you can online from a variety of different sources. Trends in hiring can, and do, change quite often, which means it is vital for you to be able to create a resume that will highlight your skills and experience and get noticed by potential employers. A resume is a bit like an elevator pitch of your accomplishments. Keep in mind keywords, format, length, readability, relevant experience, and anything else that will show hiring managers what value you can bring to their company.

Depending on your degree, stay open minded about the types of jobs you apply to. Look for work that has decent starting pay, is generally in your desired career field, and offers you a chance to gain quality experience and learn from your employer. You may be sick of learning, but college and work are two completely different worlds. Getting an internship at a company where you want to work is also a good way to get your foot in the door.

Never pass up the opportunity to work under experienced professionals that can mentor you and give you valuable skills to put on your resume for your next job. Believe it or not, only around 27 percent of college graduates find a job that is directly related to their major, according to the US Bureau of the Census. What this means is the bulk of your skills will come from on-the-job experience, so finding an employer that will help you grow is essential.

No matter what your goals are, the most important part is to keep an open mind. You never know what sorts of opportunities will present themselves. Fortune favors the bold, so get out there and start applying.