9 Productivity Tips That Can Help Students Reply

Some people think that college is just the continuation of high school, but it is not. It’s much more different than high school because it shapes you into the person you want to be.

In college, you’ll gain the knowledge, experience, and skills that will help you adapt to a variety of jobs on the market. Finding a job is never easy, but statistics show that you’ll be able to find a job, keep it, and earn more money while doing it if you finish college.

In order to finish your education, you need to be productive, and that means forgetting about certain old habits and acquiring new ones in order to boost your productivity. Don’t pay attention to what other people are saying because college is not easy. But, with the right mindset, you’ll be able to get your diploma.

Let’s take a look at some tips that’ll help you become a productive member of this society and a good student.

Go to class

Obviously, going to every class in college is always a good idea, and you need to make a habit of getting up early and going to classes. Sometimes drinking coffee with your friends or taking a nap seems like a good idea but in reality, it is not. Wherever you are, you need to get up, pack your books, and go to class. Don’t bring just your body to the classroom, bring your brain and your heart too. You’re going to need them there.

This doesn’t mean that you should completely forget about your friends. Make a schedule that revolves around your classes and stick to it. It will be hard at first, but as time goes by you’ll notice that your life will seem more productive than ever.

Take notes

Going to class is not enough, you need to learn to take notes. Let’s be honest, unless you’re a superhero you probably won’t be able to memorize every little thing your professor said. Make a habit of taking notes and stick to it. Learn note-taking techniques and write down everything quickly because your professor certainly won’t talk slowly.

Learn everything you can

Imagine that your brain is a dry sponge that needs water (knowledge) to survive. Never let that sponge be dry again. A college is a place where you can drown your brain with knowledge, not just in class, but by talking to your professors, friends, and speakers on campus. Learn to ask the right questions and talk with everyone. Eventually, you’ll get hooked on learning new things, and you’ll start asking everyone about everything.

Being shy was maybe OK in high school, but you need to ditch that mindset if you want to drown the sponge with cool, refreshing water.

Focus on hard things

If you have different things to do or learn at the same time, try focusing on hard things first. Just select the most tedious and time-consuming tasks and do them first. By doing this, you’ll avoid procrastination associated with easy projects.

Don’t multitask

Multitasking might seem like a very good idea at first, but you really need to forget about it because it damages your brain and career. When you try doing this, your brain starts switching from one thing to another, and you might end up being confused. Frequent shifts in your brain are not efficient, and they will severely decrease productivity.

Take breaks

When you first start college, you’ll probably feel overwhelmed by all the things you need to do, and you’ll probably try to learn as much as you can in a short period of time. According to an article in the Huffington Post, it is recommended that students take mental breaks approximately every 45 minutes. That’s because the brain is unable to fully focus for a longer period of time without losing steam. Some college students even hire a virtual receptionist when they don’t want to be distracted by phone calls and messages.

Make shorter deadlines

Your professors will tell you when and why something is due, and you’ll write down those dates. Don’t leave those dates on a piece of paper because you’ll probably forget about them. Get a planning app and set the alarm to remind you when every project is due.

Exercise

Mens sana in corpore sano. That means ‘’a healthy mind in a healthy body’’. Exercise whenever you can. You might think that incorporating exercise into your already busy schedule is impossible, but that’s not the case. It’s actually simple. Run to your classes and keep some small weights near you while you’re studying. In time you’ll start lifting them while studying without even noticing!

Sleep

Sleepless nights will kill your productivity. Students usually party like there’s no tomorrow, and you shouldn’t be an exception of course. Just make sure to get a good night’s sleep before an exam.

Your college experience will shape you into a person you need to be, and it will set you up for the rest of your life. Party when you can, but be productive and learn everything, because you’ll need that knowledge!


Emma Miller is a marketer and a writer from Sydney. Her focus is digital marketing, social media, start-ups and latest trends. She’s a contributor at Bizzmark blog and a mother of two.


All views and opinions of guest authors are theirs alone and are not representative of the views of Petersons.com or its parent company Nelnet.

Designing a Study Space to Increase Productivity Reply

You’ve made a pact with yourself—this is the semester you’ll finally nail that 4.0. But it will take a lot more than just hitting the books to get there. In fact, our environment, quality of sleep, and mental state can play a huge part in our overall productivity. Our brains are wired to respond to external stimuli, so if you really want to succeed in your classes, it helps to pay attention to the design of your study area as well. Here are a few tips you can use to give your area a productivity makeover.

space1

 

Clean Up Your Room

Now that you’re out on your own, it can be easy to forget about picking up. And with five classes, a research project, and making time for socializing, you hardly have time for eating, let alone chores.

Unfortunately, you’re not doing yourself any favors if you’re not keeping your dorm room or apartment clean. Researchers at Princeton University found that cluttered spaces adversely affect productivity; too much visual stimuli makes it harder to focus on the task at hand. The external sensory elements compete for your attention at a subconscious level, so even if you can’t feel it, that essay is probably taking longer than it should. It’s like your roommate’s holding band practice right next to your laptop.

Just picking up regularly will help, of course. But you should also concentrate on clearing clutter from your desk, dresser, and bedside table surfaces, too. It’s all too easy to cover these spots with wallets, toiletries, books, and other items—but this stuff counts as clutter to your mind, too.

Change Your Lighting

Experts say that Americans don’t really have the best ideas when it comes to lighting. Specifically, we tend to flood our interiors—and especially our workspaces—with a little bit too much light. Very bright spaces can cause what’s known as “disability glare”—which actually makes it harder to see the textbook in front of you. While you probably don’t have much control on your dorm or apartment’s overhead lighting, you’ll generally find your concentration improved if you switch off the big fluorescent lights and rely instead on a variety of eye-level lamps.

Another thing to consider? The color of the light has a huge impact, too. Bulbs typically range from cooler colors—blues and whites—to warmer yellowish, orange, and reddish hues. While studies show that cooler lights tend to energize, if you sleep near your study area, you should be wary about installing these bulbs. Cool-colored light can affect your circadian rhythms, particularly if you do most of your studying in the late afternoon or evening. And if your internal clock gets off schedule, the quality of your sleep will plummet, making it much harder to concentrate.

space2

Transform Your Desk into the Perfect Workspace

First thing’s first: if you’re reading this from bed, don’t! Using your mattress for studying, surfing the web, or anything other than sleeping can really wreck your night’s rest. A study published in the Journal of Sleep Research found that participants who used cell phones and computers in bed got much less sleep than those who didn’t. That’s because your brain forms a subconscious association with this spot as a place for waking activities.

So, if you want to be more productive and get better rest, it’s a good idea to get to know your desk. To make working there more amenable, clear off everything except the items you regularly use, like a pen and a pad of paper. If you can, try to divide your workspace into two different “zones”—one for taking notes by hand, and one for using your laptop. And make sure you have a trashcan at the ready so that you can keep clutter in check once and for all. Your education is too precious to let a little disorganization stand in your way!


Erin Vaughan is a blogger, gardener and aspiring homeowner.  She currently resides in Austin, TX where she writes full time for Modernize, with the goal of empowering homeowners with the expert guidance and educational tools they need to take on big home projects with confidence.


All views and opinions of guest authors are theirs alone and are not representative of the views of Petersons.com or its parent company Nelnet.