How Many Times Should You Take The GRE And When Should You Start? Reply

how-many-times-should-youThese days, many students are realizing that submitting GRE scores is a part of the graduate school application process. With this reality in mind, you may be wondering when you should start preparing for the GRE and how many times you should take it. Review the short outline below to obtain answers to these questions and more:

It’s Never Too Soon To Start

If you’re wondering when you should begin preparing for the GRE, know that it’s never too soon to start. Familiarizing yourself with the format and content of the exam can alleviate test anxiety and empower you to attain a higher score. As such, it’s a good idea to get started immediately. Luckily, there are a wide range of learning resources at your disposal. For example, companies like ETS, Barron, Peterson’s and Kaplan provide a wide range of test prep material you can use to study for the Verbal, Math, and Written components of the exam.

Taking online courses in the fields of English, Math, and Writing is another technique you can implement to prepare for the exam. If you’ve already obtained your bachelor’s in English, you may want to consider completing an online masters computer science program. This can make you a more competitive candidate for a grad school program while also sharpening your reasoning skills.

How Many Times Should You Take The GRE?

Before you decide how many times you should take the GRE, consider the following facts:

  • You can take the computer-based test once every 21 days.
  • You may take the GRE up to five times within one year.
  • If you cancel your GRE scores, the test that you took still counts towards the five annual test dates.

There are several reasons why an individual might want to take the GRE again or several times. Generally, the reason pertains to the score. In some cases, an individual might not have had sufficient time to prepare for the exam. When this happens, a substandard score may be the unwanted outcome. If you know that the score you’ve obtained is below the average score that individuals admitted into the learning institution attained, it’s definitely a good idea to retake the exam.

Keep in mind that you can take the GRE as many times as you want and submit your highest scores to the college in question. However, if you’re taking the test over and over to try to attain a perfect score, keep in mind that the GRE is not the only component of your application process. You’ll also want to concentrate on other critical elements like your letters of recommendation, statement of purpose, curriculum vitae, writing sample, etc.

If you’re serious about acing the GRE so that you can get into your dream school, now is the time to start studying. Review the information and instructions found in this quick reference guide to get on the path to an excellent score today!


Kara Masterson is a freelance writer from West Jordan, Utah. She graduated from the University of Utah and enjoys writing and spending time with her dog, Max.


All views and opinions of guest authors are theirs alone and are not representative of the views of Petersons.com or its parent company Nelnet.

Should Startups Hire New MBA Grads? Reply

StartupNew Economy, New MBA

Back in the day, MBAs were sort of for losers. People who weren’t successful in their business pursuits went to business school to gain new schools with the hope of improving their business acumen. The logic was simple back then: if you were good at business, you stayed in business. But our economy has shifted and so have many business schools in terms of how their MBA programs are shaped and whom they accept into their programs.

Many business schools are now places for networking, innovation, and learning hard skills that serve core business functions (the stuff that hasn’t changed very much). In short, MBAs are walking out of their business schools more connected, more creative, and more prepared than the average individual with a few years of work experience but lacking an MBA. Many MBAs take the advantage of their time in school making connections and thinking broadly by creating startups of their own with their colleagues.

Getting wiseMBA

The beauty of the new frontier for MBA students is that they are primed for innovation as they leave the incredibly formative experience that is graduate school. Increasingly, entrepreneurship is one of the most appealing concentrations for students in business school. Nothing spells new horizons like putting in your few years at some firm, becoming a student again, then stepping back into the world of work. MBA students are eager to apply their learning and leverage their newfound connections on behalf of whatever project will help them make their mark. And we are beginning to see startups catch on.

Startups are hungry for that balance of innovative energy alongside hard skills that keep the company’s wheels turning on a daily basis. They need a constant infusion of fresh thinking along with the ability to execute on those bright ideas. In so doing, startups operate with some degree of consistent churn among their employees, which can be seen as a strong quality assuming that the company is still meeting its internal goals.

No longer risk-averse

Whether it is a generational shift or a product of business schools shifting their admissions and programmatic priorities, today’s typical MBA student is no longer as risk averse as MBA students in past years. Indeed, MBA students are arguably going to business school to mitigate the risks in our hyper-competitive economy. They are quite literally building the networks and acquiring the skills they believe they will need to survive in the business world precisely because they wish to advance in that world. To them, not improving their standing with MBA is an even greater risk than leaving the security of their pre-MBA job.

This is an ideal reality for startups. As they themselves get smarter about risks–in order to reduce the remarkably high failure rate for startups–they find themselves with a fresh crop of MBA students to draw from, year to year, to fuel their potential success. Alongside this trend, we have business schools and MBA students themselves working hard to make MBA degrees as valuable as possible in our modern economy given its ever-shifting context. An ideal match if there ever was one.


About Vera Marie Reed

Vera Marie Reed is an ex-elementary school teacher turned freelance writer from Glendale, California. She is now a stay at home mother to her two young daughters and enjoys writing about education and parenting issues. She hopes one day to write and illustrate a series of children’s books. Follow her on Twitter at @VMReed.


All views and opinions of guest authors are theirs alone and are not representative of the views of Petersons.com or its parent company Nelnet.

Don’t Procrastinate, Register to take the GRE 1

Register for the GRESo you’ve just started up school again (or you’re getting ready to). Summer is over and it is time to get back into the college routine. Getting registered and prepared for a new school year can be a crazy process. There are many things to do in a short period of time. You’ve received your financial aid package, bought your books, and are probably getting settled back into school life. Starting a new school year is stressful and full of activity, especially your senior year. Even though it may be difficult to add even one more thing to your busy schedule, you should take the time to schedule to take the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). It’s important because the sooner you register, the better.

The Revised General Test

You’ll take the GRE revised General Test as part of your preparation for graduate school. The test is a requirement for most graduate schools and business schools. The GRE test is one of the first steps you should take toward preparing for graduate school. You can take the test up to 5 times in a 12-month period, so by registering now, you’re giving yourself the opportunity to re-take the test if you are not satisfied with your results. If you take the test multiple times, you get to choose which test results you submit to graduate or business schools. Also, different schools have different deadlines when it comes to submitting the GRE during the application process. It’s best to take the test as soon as possible so that you are ready to submit your results as soon as your chosen grad school is ready to receive them.

Registering before Preparation

What if you’re not prepared to take the test yet, should you still register? Yes! Once you register, you’ll have access to test preparation software developed by the same people who develop the test itself. It’s one more test to prepare for, one more thing to study, but the sooner you start, the more successful you are liable to be.

Even if you are unsure that you will pursue a graduate degree, it’s still a good idea to take the test. Taking the test allows you to be prepared if and when you do decide to get a graduate degree. The last thing you want is to decide to apply for a graduate program only to find that you don’t have time to take the test before the school’s deadline. Your test scores are held for five years, so even if you decide to take a break before applying to graduate school, or decide not to go to graduate school but change your mind later, you can still submit these scores. It is always good to keep your options open. Be smart and be prepared.

Recommendations for Grad School – Choosing a Recommender Reply

We just added a new article on the site designed to answer some of the most important and basic questions about letters of recommendation for graduate school. In this first release, we focus on how you should decide on someone to write your recommendations. Check it out:

http://www.petersons.com/graduate-schools/graduate-admissions/choosing-a-recommender/

And be sure to stay tuned, as we’ll have another related article up in the coming weeks that focuses on some other important considerations when it comes to your recommendations. Have further questions or ideas for an article we could write on this topic? Let us know in the comments!

Should You Submit a Supplemental Essay? Reply

I get this question a lot, particularly when students are dealing with an application that says something like, “If there’s anything else you think the admissions committee should know…” or, “If there’s any part of your application that requires further explanation…” and then gives you the option to write. What to do when given this option? More…

Personal Statement vs. Statement of Purpose – What’s the Difference? Is there one? 9

As you work to complete your graduate school applications, your program will likely ask for a personal statement, a statement of purpose, or even both. The program might give you detailed instructions on what should be included in the statement or leave you to figure it out on your own with an enigmatic ‘Include a Personal Statement/Statement of Purpose’. More…