Useful Gifts for Job-Seeking Students Reply

Looking for a job is never easy, especially when you’re a student and are pretty much clueless about the state of the business market (sorry if that’s too blunt!). The stress, the anticipation and all those applications that rarely ever result in an actual job opportunity have the tendency to turn even the most of enthusiastic individuals into quitters (hey, we’ve all been there).

If someone dear to you is looking for a job and you want to give them a useful gift – here’s a rundown of ideas that could help!

Resume expert

Resumes (Curriculum Vitae, aka CV) are the first step to getting a job interview that will help you land a job. If the CV you are submitting isn’t well written, i.e. is lacking information, has grammatical errors, is inconsistent and doesn’t follow a logical timeline, don’t expect a call back. On that note, the best gift someone can give you is a professional who specializes in writing CVs so they appear attractive to your potential employer. The CV can be interlinked with your LinkedIn profile or any profile you find could be useful. In case you’ve got no experience at all, a resume expert will still know what to write, how to write it and make the most of your current skills.

A style makeover

No matter what they say, first impressions count – in both business and private matters. Once your CV is updated and you’ve managed to get the first interview, you need to look the part. No, you don’t have to rock the Mad Men office look to be taken seriously, but you should look decent and office-ready. Even though most jobs these days can be done remotely or don’t require special business attire, you need to look professional when meeting your potential employer because that’s your chance to leave the best possible impression. One of the best gifts to get from someone is a style makeover: tips on how to dress for the interview, a different hairdo, the way to do makeup, business etiquette, etc. Getting this makeover doesn’t mean there’s something wrong with the way you look/dress now; rather, it’s an upgrade that costs you nothing and you can gain everything.

A gift card

All that job hunting can get extremely stressful, especially if you’ve got a lot of studying to do in the meantime: balancing your exams, social life, finding a job and staying sane can really take a toll on your everyday life, so – relaxing a little bit can go a long way, especially if it’s already paid for! Getting a gift card from someone close to you is one of the best ways to blow off some steam, especially if vouchers you get extend to your favorite stuff – lunching, shopping, pampering, etc. Use your Visa prepaid gift card to relax, buy a few pieces you’ll need for the interview (a new laptop bag, a blazer, smart pants, etc), have lunch with someone you love and stay stress-free (as much as possible) until you get a call from your potential employer.

Career coaching

A fantastic way to help an inexperienced friend get a job is hire a career coach. Depending on the business sphere your friend is looking to score in, a career coach can help in a number of ways: these professionals know a lot about employers’ requirements, career specifics and other important parameters that play a role in choosing a career path. On that note, a career professional is the best person to talk to about staying focused to a particular field, the best person to motivate and support you, boost your confidence and help you develop in your field. Find a reputable coach for your job-seeking friend to help them gain confidence and build a career path.

LinkedIn Premium account

Social presence plays a huge role in all spheres of our lives, business included. LinkedIn is the most popular business network that can help you connect with a number of field-focused experts that could be your first link to getting the job of your dreams. The network is interactive and regular browsing can really help you get a job in no time. Setting up a regular LinkedIn account costs nothing and it can still get you a lot of connections as long as you optimize your profile well. However, a Premium account is a safe bet that ensures a number of top-notch connections.

Good luck with the job-hunting, let us know how things went!


Emma Miller is a marketer and a writer from Sydney. Her focus is digital marketing, social media, start-ups and latest trends. She’s a contributor at Bizzmark blog and a mother of two.


All views and opinions of guest authors are theirs alone and are not representative of the views of Petersons.com.

How to Decide on a Career Path During College Reply

Going to college can seem scary and confusing. Just when you think you’ve figured out the direction of your life, something new comes along leaving you unsure and more confused than before. You can help avoid this by taking a few easy steps ahead of time.

Start with an Interest Survey

An interest survey is probably the quickest way to get a general idea of career paths you may be suited for. There are plenty of surveys and career assessment tests that you can find online, and they are great at providing insight you may not have realized about yourself. Most surveys as about personal interests, hobbies, and specific activities that you enjoy doing. They may ask you to rate your level of interest in a particular group of subjects or scenarios.

Explore Your Strengths

Some people are born ready to work with the public, while others are more suited for working behind the scenes to accomplish tasks. Perhaps you have skill in keeping people calm under pressure or in figuring out the intricate ways that machinery works. It may also help to look at the groups you participated in during high school or the summer jobs you’ve held.

Experience Is Important

If you think you may have narrowed down your options, look for some sort of internship or part-time job in the industry to get a feel for how things work. Check into opportunities to volunteer your time in order to gauge your ability to make that type of work a long-term career. Perhaps you have friends or family that you can talk to with a similar job title. Lastly, do your research to make sure you aren’t entering into a dying career field.

Above All Be Flexible

According to The New York Times, this is something that should apply regardless of what path you choose. Simply deciding on a career path does not set the rest of your life in stone, and it’s OK to have to tweak it at some point down the road. The most important part is getting started, and the rest will follow.

Going away to college can be an intimidating choice, as can deciding what career you want for the rest of your life. However, these things don’t have to be nearly as terrifying as what they may seem to be at first. Take the process slow and one step at a time and you will be well on your way to a satisfying career in no time.


Hannah Whittenly is a freelance writer and mother of two from Sacramento, CA. She enjoys kayaking and reading books by the lake. You can follow her on twitter and LinkedIn.


All views and opinions of guest authors are theirs alone and are not representative of the views of Petersons.com.

Five Ways to Increase Your Job Prospects While in College Reply

Most college students get out of college to face the harsh reality that getting a job isn’t as easy as they had thought.

Contrary to the notion they’ve been brought up with — to “go to college, get good grades and get a job” — they realize the hard way that it isn’t so easy, and that they need to do more than just get good grades in college to get a job. Don’t despair, though. Doing the following five things will significantly increase your job prospects as a college student:

Brush Up on Your Interpersonal Skills: Many college students, especially in this social media age, lack interpersonal skills. Interestingly, though, research shows that 60 percent of employers aren’t hiring applicants due to lack of interpersonal skills. Add not making a good first impression to the mix and most college job applications are dead on arrival.

If you are offered communication classes in college, especially nonverbal communication classes, be sure to enrol in them. Join groups that allow you to be more social. It’ll help you in the very near future.

Gather Job Experience While in College: Many college students are familiar with the catch-22 situation of getting a job after college: As a fresh graduate you apply to companies expressing your interest in getting a job. They ask you how many years of job experience you have. You tell them you have none and they say they need at least a year or two of job experience to hire you. You can’t get hired with no job experience, yet you need job experience to get hired.

The solution to this is simple: while still in college, start to build up on your job experience. Doing part-time jobs, volunteer jobs, etc, slowly and gradually build up experience. When you get out of college and you are able to boast of two years of job experience you slowly accumulated, you just significantly increasedphase out your prospects of getting hired.

Identify Job Trends and Align Your College Education Accordingly: For some college students, by the time they are out of college their job prospects would have diminished significantly. This is because jobs related to what they studied have been phased out. For example, while many jobs have already been replaced by computers, even more will be soon — these include: insurance underwriters, bank tellers, financial analysts and even construction workers. On the other hand, some jobs in some fields (e.g. IT) are struggling to get people and will be available for a considerable long time. According to this compilation of cyber security statistics, for example, there will be an estimated 3.5 million unfilled cyber security jobs by 2021 — up from about 1 million in 2016. In other words, if your college education aligns with cyber security, your employment is pretty much automatic.

Try to Get a Certification: Being certified will significantly increase your job prospects as well as your potential compensation. This especially applies in certain fields. For example, in the accounting field getting a CPA will automatically make you more appealing to prospective employers. It will increase your potential compensation, too. Same goes for getting an MBA in the business field. While having just a degree can still help you get hired, getting a certification will double your chances.

Work Towards an Advanced Degree: Getting a Masters or a PhD will certainly require some extra time, but it is well worth its weight in gold. You can’t get into a lot of management level positions without having an advanced degree. At the same time, a lot of entry level jobs now require you to have at least a Master’s degree before they hire you. Now, what many college students don’t know is that if you want to get an advanced degree, work starts in college. If your grades are consistently poor in college, you could kill your chances of getting an advanced degree. If your grades are consistently good, however, you could get a scholarship.


John Stevens is the founder and CEO of Hosting Facts.


All views and opinions of guest authors are theirs alone and are not representative of the views of Petersons.com or its parent company Nelnet.

Fresh Out of College? Do These 4 Things to Increase Your Chances of Getting Your Dream Job 1

According to research from the U.S Department of Labor, 53 percent of recent college graduates are unemployed and an estimated 44 percent of college graduates work in jobs that don’t require a college degree.

When you consider that only 56 percent of college students will earn their degree within six years, and that many college students have taken on enormous debts to complete their education, it becomes clear that having a degree has become a liability for most people. It doesn’t have to be, though.

If you’re fresh out of college and are on a hunt for a job, here are four things you can do to increase your chances of getting your dream job:

  1. Pay Careful Attention to the Resume and Job Application Process

Most fresh college graduates believe that once they have good grades and graduate from a renowned school, their job problems are automatically solved. It doesn’t work that way.

When you’re fresh out of college, you are practically untested and very few companies will simply want to “take a risk” on you. In this case, it will be immensely valuable to learn how to sell yourself more effectively by working on your resume skills. Some tips include:

  • Keep your resume simple and to the point — avoid the temptation to make things wordy.
  • Highlight relevant experience you have attained.
  • Summarize key facts with bullet points.

Realize that most recruiters will spend less than 7 seconds looking at your resume. Keeping things simple and clear will be your biggest advantage.

  1. Stack Up on Experience as Soon as You Can

Many fresh college graduates are in a sort of catch-22: fresh out of college, every organization they send their application to require them to have years of job experience. They are unable to get a job since no one is willing to hire them without experience, and without a job they are unable to get experience.

According to Nicholas Dutko, CEO of Auto Transport Quote Services, the solution to this is to stack up on relevant job experience as soon as possible: “Anything that gives you the required job experience adds up: this includes taking on relevant jobs in which you will be paid significantly less than your desired rates or required to work in a position less than your desired position, or even pro bono work.”

  1. Don’t Ignore LinkedIn

Most recruiters will do a background check on you before hiring you — and this happens majorly on social media these days Research shows that 94 percent of recruiters use LinkedIn for recruiting — which is interesting considering that just 36 percent of candidates are active on LinkedIn.

If you don’t have a LinkedIn profile, create one now; use tags, descriptions and a professional picture to make yourself a more attractive prospect to prospective employers.

  1. Dress the Part

We’ve been told never to judge a book by its cover. But we still do.

First impressions matter; when you finally land an interview, it is important to dress the part. It’s easy to fall into the temptation of wanting to be casual, hip and trendy. However, this could stand against you getting the job of your dreams.

Research and understand the culture of the company you are applying to. If it is part of their culture to be hip and trendy, dress hip and trendy to their interview. If it is their culture to look formal and professional, dress formal and professional to the interview. The more they feel that you are like them, the better your chances of snagging that job.


Emma Johnson is a small business consultant who is passionate about elearning and the impact technology is having on the education industry.


All views and opinions of guest authors are theirs alone and are not representative of the views of Petersons.com or its parent company Nelnet.

Your “After College” Survival Guide: How to Survive as a Fresh College Graduate Reply

Saving for educationBeth Bowman graduated college bubbling with excitement. She had accrued over $25,000 in student debts, but it didn’t matter because she felt she was pursuing a degree that will help her land her dream job of being a cultural consultant for a non-governmental organization. Now out of college, she was excited about her prospects.

However, Bowman soon realized the hard way that we don’t live in a perfect world. After sending about 500 job applications — to which she got no response — she now manages at a job as a policy administration specialist, a job that does not require a college degree.

Bowman’s story isn’t an isolated example.

Statistics from Pew Research Center show that it is becoming increasingly harder for college graduates to find good jobs: a whopping 44 percent of college graduates work at jobs that don’t require a college degree, and 20 percent of college graduates work in low-wage jobs that pay below $25,000. That obviously doesn’t justify today’s average student debt of $37,172.

Here are some survival tips to help you cope as a fresh college graduate:

  1. Make Preparations before Graduating College: Considering the difficulties in getting quality jobs faced by college graduates today, it is best to start making preparations before graduating college. Research shows that employers still value job experience — and having experience as a paid intern makes things even better.

The good news is that you don’t have to be out of college to get relevant job experience. You can still intern while in college; look for relevant organizations that have internship organizations for you while you’re still in college, and slowly build up your work experience. By the time you graduate, you don’t have to be disadvantaged due to lack of work experience.

  1. Get Creative About Job Applications: As a fresh graduate, don’t assume that you can get hired by applying to advertised jobs. Some sources show that up to 80 percent of jobs are unadvertised.

Instead:

  • Regularly reach out to family and friends to inquire about unadvertised job openings they know of.
  • Avoid having your life story on your cover letter. Research shows that recruiters spend less than 10 seconds going through it. Keep your cover letter short and simple.
  • Don’t ignore the internet in your job search. Apparently, 80 percent of recruiters have hired people through LinkedIn. Create and polish your LinkedIn profile.
  • Don’t just wait while you try to get hired. Take advantage of technology to accelerate your prospect of getting hired: you can start a blog or create a simple website. Case studies abound of people who got hired through their blog/website, and many said employers were wowed more by their blogs than by their degree.
  1. Pursue Side Jobs and Alternate Career Options: Many college graduates wait for years, sending hundreds of job applications, without getting their dream job and spending all that time doing nothing. This eventually leads to depression.

Get creative about other ways to earn while looking for your dream job. You can easily find side jobs that will help you sustain yourself while pursuing desirable job opportunities; income from these side jobs reduce pressure on you and help cater to some of your day to day responsibilities.


About John Stevens

John Stevens is an entrepreneur and founder of HostingFacts.com, an online portal that reviews web hosts. He is a regular contributor to Standford’s blog, Business Insider, Entrepreneur.com and other major publications. Follow him on Twitter @hostingfactsj.


All views and opinions of guest authors are theirs alone and are not representative of the views of Petersons.com or its parent company Nelnet.

What’s Next After Graduation? Looking for Your First Job 1

Congratulations, you’ve graduated from college! But now that you’ve gotten your diploma, what’s next?

Step one: Find a job.

If you haven’t found a job and you are already into the summer of your graduation, then it is time to update your resume, apply for a number of jobs that you qualify for, and prepare for the professional interviews that are to come.

When building your resume, be sure to research as much as you can online from a variety of different sources. Trends in hiring can, and do, change quite often, which means it is vital for you to be able to create a resume that will highlight your skills and experience and get noticed by potential employers. A resume is a bit like an elevator pitch of your accomplishments. Keep in mind keywords, format, length, readability, relevant experience, and anything else that will show hiring managers what value you can bring to their company.

Depending on your degree, stay open minded about the types of jobs you apply to. Look for work that has decent starting pay, is generally in your desired career field, and offers you a chance to gain quality experience and learn from your employer. You may be sick of learning, but college and work are two completely different worlds. Getting an internship at a company where you want to work is also a good way to get your foot in the door.

Never pass up the opportunity to work under experienced professionals that can mentor you and give you valuable skills to put on your resume for your next job. Believe it or not, only around 27 percent of college graduates find a job that is directly related to their major, according to the US Bureau of the Census. What this means is the bulk of your skills will come from on-the-job experience, so finding an employer that will help you grow is essential.

No matter what your goals are, the most important part is to keep an open mind. You never know what sorts of opportunities will present themselves. Fortune favors the bold, so get out there and start applying.