Studying Law: 4 College Programs for Working in the Legal Field Reply

So you want to work in the legal field. This means you are likely evaluating different careers and education options to find one that suits you. It’s important for potential students to evaluate legal education programs they are considering carefully to ensure the programs are accredited and certified by the proper organizations, such as the American Bar Association, or getting jobs might prove difficult or even impossible. Here are four different types of college programs you can consider if you wish to work in the legal field.

1. Pre-Law Programs

If you know you want to work in the legal field as an undergrad, you can enroll in pre-law programs to best prepare you for law school. Pre-law programs help students develop skills that will be very useful for their law careers, including solid writing, communication, critical thinking and problem solving skills. These programs prepare you for law programs in higher education and teach you the skills needed to be successful in a legal career. You can pair pre-law programs with other degrees to give yourself a more specialized education.

2. Paralegal Studies Programs

If you want to work in law and do many of the same things lawyers do without getting a law degree or having some of the heavy responsibilities of attorneys, consider going to school to be a paralegal. Generally the job prospects for paralegals are greater too, as law offices attempt to cut down on operating costs. You can become a paralegal after completing a program for an associate degree or by completing a certificate program if you have a degree in another field.

3. Juris Doctor Programs

Going to school for a J.D. is what aspiring attorneys must do in order to practice law in the United States. You also need to go through one of these programs to become a judge. For a more specialized education, you can also go on to get an additional master of law degree, which requires an additional year of schooling in most cases and allows law students to specialize in particular areas of law. There are several online masters programs available as well from good law schools in Florida and elsewhere.

4. Doctor of Juridical Science Programs

If you want to teach law, you will also have to enroll in one of these programs. It is the highest education level for the legal field. These programs are heavily research-focused and students generally need to know their research interests before applying for these programs. You will spend most of your time compiling a dissertation.

There are more education options for studying law than many people realize—a juris doctor degree is not your only option. Consider any of the above programs you might be interested in if you want to study law and work in the legal field. There are not only multiple levels of legal education, but also different college programs for other legal careers, like paralegals. You should be able to find something that suits your needs with a little bit of research.


About the author: Anica is a professional content and copywriter from San Francisco, California. She loves dogs, the ocean, and anything outdoor-related. She was raised in a big family, so she’s used to putting things to a vote. Also, cartwheels are her specialty. You can connect with Anica here.


All views and opinions of guest authors are theirs alone and are not representative of the views of Petersons.com or its parent company Nelnet.

4 Things to Consider When Applying to Universities Reply

Choosing a college can be really easy. Or really hard. It all depends on a number of factors, some within your control and some beyond it. There are some components, however, that universally need to be considered when deciding on colleges that should be on your application list.

  1. Fit

Perhaps the most important thing to consider is fit. This is why it’s important to actually visit any universities you are seriously considering attending. Meet people – staff, professors and students – to really get a feel of the place and see how you feel about fitting in there. Not every college is for everybody, and you might find yourself simply liking the feel of some over others. Lots of schools have a website like this one for UC Clermont College. Spending some time on the schools website can help you get a feel for what the culture there will be like.

  1. Cost

While it’s not something most potential college students want to think about, the reality is that cost is always something you must consider when applying to universities. If you get more financial help to attend one school over another, that alone might make the decision for you. Or it might not. Always apply to schools you want because you might end up with more financial aid than you thought, and your college experience is not to be decided by money alone. But cost should always be a factor.

  1. Breadth Of Degree Choices

You are likely to change your major during college – that much is a fact. So if you’re looking at a very small school for a very specific program they are well-known for, what happens if you want to change your major and you then find there are not many other options to choose from? The smart thing to do is not only have a few majors in mind you might be interested in pursuing, but applying to colleges that have programs in a handful of subjects you are interested in, as well as other options you might not have even considered.

  1. Your Chances At Getting In

Have a good idea of the acceptance rate and average accepted student GPA of the schools you are considering. It might be best to simply not apply to any you have no realistic chance of getting into. If you are applying to a school or two that might be hard to get into, go the extra mile when crafting your application, essay and interview to present yourself as a student they want to accept. But also realistically determine if you’ll be able to keep up in the academic environment of those schools if you are accepted. And always apply to a “backup” school that you’re sure to get into.

The decision of what colleges to apply for is a very personal one, and there are a lot of things to consider. The benefits of a college education, including becoming a more well-rounded human being, better employment aspects and better lifetime salaries make it all worth it. Ultimately, follow both your heart and your head, as well as consider the four factors mentioned above, and good luck on those applications!


Kara Masterson is a freelance writer from Utah. She enjoys tennis and spending time with her family. Kara recommends looking into diplomacy programs for more information on degrees that can help save the world.


All views and opinions of guest authors are theirs alone and are not representative of the views of Petersons.com or its parent company Nelnet.

How To Help Improve Public Education While Earning Your Degree Reply

One of the best ways to prepare for a rewarding career is to complete a degree program in your chosen field. Whether you are planning to pursue a career in education or just have a desire to help people reach their full potential, students can promote higher education in a variety of ways. Consider these helpful tips to advocate higher education as an important necessity in today’s competitive economy.

Higher Education Websites

Creating a website to promote higher education is an excellent way to inform the general public about the advantages of earning a college degree. Students can use website builders such as Weebly or Wix at no additional cost. Many website builders come with templates that makes it easier to create content. It’s important to explain how higher education can help people achieve career goals as well as provide helpful ways to finance the cost of college.

Utilize Social Media

Social media websites such as Facebook and Twitter have gained popularity in recent years. Promoting higher education from your social media websites is a quick and easy way to reach large audiences. Common ways to advocate higher learning include posting articles and links for people interested in continuing their education. Students can also create blogs on various education topics or share personal experiences of how higher education changed their life.

Guest Speaking and Networking

Students can use their communication skills to help promote higher education. It’s important to encourage friends and relatives to continue their education. Education can also be a great conversation topic when meeting new people. Many students volunteer as a guest speaker at a local high school to help young people prepare for college. Common speaking topics include general admission requirements and tuition assistance programs. Students can also attend networking events and career fairs to promote public education.

Higher Education Careers

A career in higher education administration is an excellent occupation for people with a passion to help others succeed. According to the Washington Post, the career outlook for higher education administrators is positive and stable. A masters in higher education administration is offered at colleges such as Abilene Christian University. These degree programs cover topics related to diversity issues, student development, and conflict resolution.

Students can make a difference in their community by promoting higher education. Creating a website or posting to social media is a great way to advocate public education. People can also volunteer as guest speaker at local schools or pursue a professional career in higher education administration.


 

 

Brooke Chaplan is a freelance writer and blogger. She lives and works out of her home in Los Lunas, New Mexico. She loves the outdoors and spends most her time hiking, biking, and gardening. For more information contact Brooke via Twitter  or Facebook.


All views and opinions of guest authors are theirs alone and are not representative of the views of Petersons.com or its parent company Nelnet.

How to Make the Best Use of a College Counselor Reply

Your college counselor can be a coach, strategist, and therapist all rolled into one. Generally speaking, they’re professionals who assist students with academic goals, careers, and campus life. Here are just a few of the reasons you should seek out your college counselor.

Make a list

You can discuss your life goals, aptitudes, and preferences with a counselor in order to discover what you should look for from higher education. Are you a better fit for a degree in computer sciences or sports medicine? Perhaps you’re already tied to a job but it’s your dream to serve the community. An online master of public administration might be the best option. Your counselor can help you compose a list of factors helping you narrow down your choices to the most rewarding options.

Graduate programs

Most students are faced with choice of going on to grad school. The right school for your talents, goals, and finances might be difficult to determine. A college counselor can help you locate the best opportunities in terms of finances, prerequisites, the programs you’re a good fit for, and related career opportunities. They can help you tailor your current undergraduate course schedule or prepare for your GRE. You don’t want to gamble on any aspect of your education.

Plan your career

One of the chief motivators in going to college is to prepare for a good career. Many people graduate with a degree only to find there’s very few opportunities in their field, or wind up spending year after year in a job they hate while struggling to pay off student loans. A college counselor can provide career advice to prevent you from falling into these situations. The sooner you begin planning your long-term career with your counselor, the better your chances of real-world success.

Lower anxiety

Many college counselors say that the number of students they see with psychological problems is growing. If you’re having difficulty adjusting to the pressures of study, finances, and campus culture, a college counselor can be your friend and mentor. Their job is to help you successively complete your educational goals and prepare you for a career. Before anxieties become depression or disrupt your relationships, talk it over with a counselor.

If you start planning before you graduate, you can eliminate bad choices that waste time and money and affect your future. Your college counselor will be happy to help you realize your dreams.


Dixie Somers is a freelance writer and blogger for business, home, and family niches. Dixie lives in Phoenix, Arizona, and is the proud mother of three beautiful girls and wife to a wonderful husband. She can be found on Facebook and Twitter.


All views and opinions of guest authors are theirs alone and are not representative of the views of Petersons.com or its parent company Nelnet.

On Track to College: How to Teach Children about Higher Education Reply

Most parents want their children to go to college. Unfortunately, figuring out how to talk to them about it can be difficult. Fortunately, there are three things you can do to make sure your child is taught about higher education in a way that will help you both.

Set Expectations

What does higher education mean to your family? It can be difficult for a child to start thinking about college if he or she hasn’t had anyone to model expectations. If you expect that your child will go to college, start talking about it early on. Make sure he or she understands that this is the educational path that you support, and that you expect him or her to have college plans in mind while in high school. A little thought towards the future can go a long way.

Graduate Degrees

It’s also important that you talk to your child about education beyond the first four years. If your child wants a job in public administration, for example, you’ll need to talk to him or her about the possibility of getting a master in public administration or other degrees they may be interested in. Masters degrees are increasingly important in the work force, and teens who don’t know that might set their sights too low when they seek out a path in college. Giving your children a look at the whole educational process can be a great way to give them realistic expectations for their futures.

It’s About the Journey

It’s also important that you discuss college as just one step in your teen’s life. Sadly, there’s no guarantee that he or she will get into the college that he or she (or you) want. College should be viewed as chance for education, not just a goal in and of itself. If you are able to impress upon your child that college is a place to learn and to get on the right path, he or she can approach the experience without dreading what comes next. College is great, but it shouldn’t be the final goal of anyone’s life.

If you want to talk to your child about college, make sure to start now. Begin setting expectations, talk about further education, and make sure your child knows that no one school is the only option. If you are willing to talk to him or her frankly, he or she just might start to understand why college is so important to you.


Rachelle Wilber is a freelance writer living in the San Diego, California area. She graduated from San Diego State University with her Bachelor’s Degree in Journalism and Media Studies. She tries to find an interest in all topics and themes, which prompts her writing. When she isn’t on her porch writing in the sun, you can find her shopping, at the beach, or at the gym. Follow her on Twitter and Facebook.


All views and opinions of guest authors are theirs alone and are not representative of the views of Petersons.com or its parent company Nelnet.

Top 4 Reasons a Medical Degree Is an Excellent Education Choice Reply

When a child gets asked about what they’d like to be when they grow up, a common answer is a doctor. When the follow-up question is asked, a child usually reasons that doctors help people. This is what makes this career path attractive to many. Well, this is true. Doctors do a lot to help people and a medical degree is an excellent educational choice to consider if you’d like to work in health care. There are plenty of reasons why it’s a great idea to pursue a medical degree as an educational option. Consider these four.

1. Positive Contribution

With a medical degree, you’ll be in a perfect position to give back to the world in a very palpable way. When people are in dire need of improved physical health, they’ll do almost anything to regain it. As a professional with a medical degree, you’ll get equipped with the expertise needed to help people resolve physical ailments and find solutions.

2. Mental Expansion

Getting into medical school is no easy feat. You’ll need to study and prepare for the MCAT. You’ll also need excellent grades in biology, chemistry and other science-related classes. You’ll need to learn to retain a ton of important information. Through this process, there’s no doubt whether or not your knowledge base will increase.

The medical school will naturally expose you to new lessons and a better understanding of how to approach the healthcare industry. You’ll also become an expert in your specific specialty. While medical school may be stressful and time-consuming, it’ll definitely expand your mind.

3. Personal Achievement

In society, certain careers are respected more than others. Doctors and lawyers are some of the most respected. Most people appreciate the amount of studying and work that goes into graduating with a medical degree. When you walk into a room and have letters behind your name, people will naturally perceive and approach you differently.

4. Professional Development

A medical degree is a great choice because it prepares you for the future. As the job market continues to shift and change, there will always be a need for medical professionals. Whether you choose a bachelor’s degree in sonography online, or you prefer ophthalmology or pediatrics, someone will always be in need of your specialty. Knowing this allows you to feel more freedom to focus on professional development and honing in on your craft.

There’s nothing like knowing that you’ve chosen a field that’s personally gratifying and enriching. If the thought of med school intrigues and excites you, do your best to give it your all and pursue this option.


About the author: Anica is a professional content and copywriter from San Francisco, California. She loves dogs, the ocean, and anything outdoor-related. She was raised in a big family, so she’s used to putting things to a vote. Also, cartwheels are her specialty. You can connect with Anica here. Anica is a writer for Ohio University, which offers a range of degrees including an online master’s in athletic administration.


All views and opinions of guest authors are theirs alone and are not representative of the views of Petersons.com or its parent company Nelnet.

5 Degrees That Can Help You Combine Everything You Love Reply

It is estimated that only 13 percent of the American workforce loves what they do. This is no way to live life, so consider the five following degrees that can combine work with what you love.

Communications Degree

Approximately 87 percent of people that work from home are happier than those that do not. This is likely due to the fact that you get to set your own schedule, and you can spend more time with your family. A telecommunications degree might help you achieve this goal though this is just one option.

Health Care

Some people feel good when they make a positive impact on others. One field that can provide you with the opportunity to help others is the health care field, which makes a health administration master’s degree a good choice. Something like this is especially a good choice if you are interested in the business world as well as the world of healthcare. It really is amazing how many degrees mix topics like this.

The Business World

Some people out there simply cannot deal with others telling them what to do. This is where a business degree might come in handy. This type of education gives you the tools to start your own business so that you can be in charge and, ultimately, be a lot happier. Sure, it may take a lot of work to get a business off the ground, but a person who desires to work on their own will be happier with this challenge than working under others.

Philosophy of Economics

An economics degree may be the right choice for those who are interested in learning how the economy works. This type of degree can open up all sorts of opportunities such as politics, law, or even a position in the business world. It is the kind of degree that can lead to various types of careers just in case you are not sure what you want.

Environmental Degree

You may be one of those people who are interested in finding a way to help humanity as a whole, which means that a job in agriculture might be the right choice. This encompasses information about biology, humanity, politics, and agricultural science. You might end up working for a company working to solve world hunger, and everyone wants to be in the forefront of that problem.

There is no doubt that there are other degrees that might satisfy the true calling of your soul. The key is to ask yourself what you really want, and look for degrees that can help put you where you really want to be.


Kara Masterson is a freelance writer from Utah. She enjoys tennis and spending time with her family. Kara recommends looking into diplomacy programs for more information on degrees that can help save the world.


All views and opinions of guest authors are theirs alone and are not representative of the views of Petersons.com or its parent company Nelnet.

First Year at University? 3 Things You Should Know Reply

You’ve picked your roommate and you know what dorm you’re staying in. You’ve even done the campus tour and mapped out the closest dining hall. You think you’re ready, but the real work is just beginning. Your first year of college can definitely be a huge life change, but it is a great life change. It definitely takes a lot of preparation though. It will definitely be unlike anything you have ever experienced. Here’s what you should know to thrive during your first year at college.

  1. Map it Out

In any college setting, it’s common for professors to assign a research paper to be turned in towards the end of the semester. Papers like this can take a lot of research and a lot of time. That’s why you are going to want to make sure to get started on it as soon as you can. By doing that you can avoid a lot of heartache and stress further on down the road. Sadly, chances are the paper will be mentioned once on the first day of class and then will hardly be mentioned again. That is until the day it’s due. Without proper organization and a plan to meet all of the deadlines you will face, you may find yourself up the proverbial creek without a paddle. Get a planner, use sticky notes or write it on the front of your notebook. Do whatever works best for you to stay organized and ensure you get all those papers with longer deadlines completed on time.

  1. Find Your Study Spot

By this stage in your scholastic career, you should be well acquainted with the most effective study strategies for your learning style. Now it’s time to take what you know about your learning techniques and apply that in a whole new environment. Scope out all the best study spots on campus. Find the space that will benefit you and then create a study schedule. Make consistent study dates with yourself and keep them. Resist the temptation to ditch the books in favor of pizza and dedicate yourself to your study spot. You’ll be glad you did.

  1. Become An Expert

Counselors are there to help and guide, but they also have a lot of students and expect you to take charge of your education. Understanding the requirements and deadlines for your program can keep you on the right track and make sure you are prepared for graduation. These requirements are also imperative if you want to pursue a graduate degree. Some programs like the criminal justice master’s program actually place their requirements directly on their webpage making it easy to track your progress and make sure you have what you need to gain acceptance into the next phase of your education.

College is a wonderful experience, full of excitement and challenges. These tips will help you embrace all that college is and allow you to conquer your first year. As you keep yourself organized and disciplined you’ll find handling your schedule more bearable. While most of the weight of your success rests on your shoulders, never be afraid to ask for help from teachers, counselors, and upper classmen.


Kara Masterson is a freelance writer from Utah. She enjoys tennis and spending time with her family. Kara recommends looking into diplomacy programs for more information on degrees that can help save the world.


All views and opinions of guest authors are theirs alone and are not representative of the views of Petersons.com or its parent company Nelnet.

Choosing the Right Degree: When it Matters and When it Doesn’t Reply

Confusion , Direction , ArrowPicking the right degree in college can be a difficult decision. After you graduate, you will want to be happy with your decision and be able to get a job in a career field that you enjoy. However, you don’t necessarily have to make the decision right away. Most colleges will want you to declare your major by the end of your second year, so you’ve got some time to explore your options.

Take an aptitude test.

Every college will have an advisor’s office, and I would be surprised to hear if everyone didn’t offer some kind of aptitude test to help you identify your strengths and weaknesses. Take multiple aptitude tests at your school as well as online to narrow down your choices.

These tests are great for figuring out what careers are right for you right now, but also keep in mind that college is a place to learn and improve all of your skills. So even if the aptitude test doesn’t coincide with what you actually want to do, they are still helpful in giving you suggestions and ideas for determining your future.

Don’t worry about it right away.

Being undecided or undeclared for the first couple of years in college is OK. Not everyone should or does know what they want to do their first years in school. The majority of your first two years in college will be spent on general requirements and prerequisites for your upper division classes anyway. While you want to take the right prerequisites, plan on taking classes that help you explore opportunities and will also steer you in the right direction.

Research career paths.

Career paths are just that: a path towards a career. These paths aren’t exact and you will be able to take multiple roads to get you where you want to be. The majority of students will end up changing their major throughout their first couple of years, and quite a lot of graduates will end up working in jobs that aren’t directly related to their major.

When you are researching career paths, keep this in mind. In other words, research online and talk with people who work in that field and see what they majored in and how they got to be where they are. For entrepreneurs especially, the path to their success will come from a plethora of different backgrounds. LinkedIn is a great place to start – look at professional’s profiles and see where their academic and work experience has taken them.

Talk with your mentors, parents, and teachers.

Your family, mentors, teachers, and school counselors will know a lot about you and have a lot of knowledge about the world. Reaching out to these folk will help give you ideas about what degree is the best for you. Ask them about their past experiences and tell them to be honest about their advice. You’ll learn more than you think when you listen to their nuggets of truth.

Considering graduate school or an advanced degree?

The one time when you will want to have a definite idea of what you want to major in is if you plan on going into a specified career. For example, if you want to go to medical school you will have to major in a small number of specific degrees to have the knowledge and prerequisites to pass the MCATs and get into a medical school.

There are certain advanced degrees that don’t absolutely require a degree in the same field to get into, though. An MBA for example will typically take any bachelor degree graduate as long as they pass the required entrance exams and show an aptitude to succeed in their program through the admissions essay and qualified experience.

Keep an open mind.

More than anything keep an open mind as you never know what kinds of opportunities will present themselves and what you might be interested in. Take classes that help you both explore your interests and things you don’t know are your interests yet. Never been in a school play but always wanted to? Take an acting class as one of your liberal arts requirements and see what you think. College isn’t only about preparing for a career, it’s also about experiencing things you never have before.

Juniors: Make a List of Potential Colleges Reply

Making a list of collegesAs a high school junior, the task of picking a college can be daunting. There are so many colleges out there. So much to consider. There are a variety of different guidebooks and websites designed to help you search for a college that is right for you. Sometimes, the sheer amount of information on colleges makes things more confusing. You won’t really know for sure if a college is right for you until you visit it, but you certainly can’t visit every single college you find interesting. So how do you decide?

The best way to start is to make a list of colleges that you could see yourself attending.  In preparation for making this list, it’s important to really consider what qualities you are looking for in a college. It is much easier to evaluate a school, once you have done some thinking about what you want in a college. Make a list of the things you need and want from your prospective school.

Qualifications

Some qualifications are obvious and fairly objective. If you know what you want your major to be, or at least have an idea of where your main interests lie, then you’ll want to make sure that the school you are looking at offers degree programs that fit your goals. Location can be a factor.  Do you want to go to school close to home, or are you looking to move away? Cost is always a factor, though one that is difficult to measure.  Certainly you don’t want to add a school to your list if the cost to attend will exceed your budget.  Still, many schools that may have a tuition expense that is out of your range also have grants and scholarships that can help you offset those costs. A school’s athletic program might be an important decision factor for athletes who plan on continuing their sport at the college level.

Other qualifications are more subjective. What is the best college environment for you? Would you rather be in a big university or a smaller college? In a big city or a smaller one? College is not just about classes and grades and diplomas.  It’s also an experience.  Think about the things that are important to you as a person. What are your hobbies?  What kind of weather do you prefer? What clubs do you think you’d like to join?  What is the overall environment like?  These questions are much harder to answer without visiting the college – and if you are making fairly long list, you probably cannot visit them all! Sometimes visiting the school’s website, talking to someone who attends or did attend the college, or to the admissions personnel might help with some of these more subjective questions.

Share Your List of Schools

Once you have more clearly defined what types of colleges you’d like to attend, then it is much easier to research and add good candidates to your list of colleges.  Throughout this process it is a good idea to talk with your parents, other family members and your high school counselor to get feedback.  Those around you, who know you well, can be great resources because they can provide insight and ideas that may not have occurred to you. Once you have a list, they can also help you narrow it down to a handful of colleges that you can visit.