It’s March – Which College Should You Apply To and When? Reply

So you’ve gathered a list of prospective colleges and you are ready to apply. But with applications fees stacking up creating a financial burden, which ones are the right ones to apply to?

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Girl pushing university button on search toolbar of virtual screen.

By now you should have a good list of 5 to 10 or more colleges that you are considering attending once you graduate high school. These colleges should include colleges that are a long shot, some conservative selections, as well as safety nets like local universities and community colleges. The reality is, everyone wants to go to the best college, but a lot have to go to a more conservative option due to a number of reasons, including the cost of attendance, how far the college is from family, and what the college has to offer.

Whatever the case, March of your junior year in high school is a good time to start narrowing down your list of schools. But, how do you know which school is the right school for you?

There are many factors that come into play when choosing which school you want to attend, and ultimately the decision is up to you. However, there are a few things you should keep in consideration no matter what your particular situation is, for example, the cost of attendance, what majors the school has to offer, and the geographic location of the school in terms of where you want to live and how close you want to be from home. Other things to consider are extracurricular activities, such as clubs, sports, and special programs, housing options, and last but not least, the facilities on campus, like science labs, theaters, and gyms.

Each of these things should be carefully considered when deciding where to apply to. You don’t want to end up paying for application fees to places you don’t plan to go to anyway. Some of the can be upwards of over $100 to submit your application.

Get the best information on how to choose the right college for you with Peterson’s.

11 Reasons Why Going to an In-State College is Better Reply

application4Deciding whether or not you want to go to college in-state or out-of-state can be a tough decision. Affordability, acceptance, independence, and where your friends go can all factor into your decision. While going to college out-of-state has perks if your budget allows, going in-state can save you a lot of money and headache, especially in the first couple years of school. Consider these tops reasons why you should go to school in your home state.

  1. Consider your budget

In-state tuition is significantly cheaper than out-of-state tuition. In some cases, schools charge more than twice as much if you are coming from a different state. Reducing the amount of student loans you have to take out in order to graduate should be on the top of your list when considering which college you want to go to.

  1. In-state colleges allow you to be close to home

Even if you choose a college that is a couple of hour drive away from your home town, being close to home has its benefits. During breaks, you can easily drive home to be with your family and friends if you go to an in-state college. On top of that, having your family close will allow you to have a greater sense of support when you need to reach out for help — having a free place to do your laundry is huge perk as well.

  1. In-state colleges are typically academically equivalent

In-state colleges often get a bad reputation, especially when you consider them next to ivy league and division one schools, but don’t think that your state’s college won’t offer the same amount of academic value as the other schools. Depending on where you live, your state college might be one of those high-ranking universities anyway, but even if it isn’t, you will still be able to obtain your degree from an accredited institution and find a job after you graduate.

  1. It is often easier to get accepted into an in-state college

Getting accepted into colleges is often not considered as much as it should be when students first apply. Some colleges can be hard to get into if they are out-of-state, especially if you don’t have very high SAT and ACT scores, perfect GPA, and extracurricular activities that show you will bring value to the school. Typically, however, in-state colleges take into consideration that you are from in-state and can be easier to get accepted.

  1. Consider scholarships and additional financial aid benefits to going in-state

Some states offer additional financial assistance to students who go to school in their home state. These types of state programs can help you keep your student loans to a minimum while still being able to achieve a high level of education. Check with your college’s financial aid office to see what types of extra financial assistance might be available to you.

  1. Community college is a great way to save money while getting your generals out of the way

Another decision high school graduates have to make is whether or not to go to a state college or university, or a community college in your home city. While community colleges don’t offer a complete bachelor’s degree, they do often offer two-year technical degrees, certificates, and can be a great way to get your generals out of the way before you go to a state college where tuition is typically higher.

  1. Where you get your bachelor’s degree doesn’t matter as much as you think

Yes, getting a degree from an ivy league school like Harvard or Yale is better when finding a job or applying for graduate school, but this comes with a huge financial burden. For the majority of people who get their bachelor’s degree, what matters most to employers is that you are hard-working and have academic and professional experience.

  1. Consider where you plan on working

If you are planning on finding a job in your home state, employers will value students who graduate close to where the company is located. Especially for entry-level positions, home-town companies often want graduates who have family close because it is a signal to employers that you don’t plan on leaving.

  1. Save money on travel and living expenses

This isn’t something that most students think about. When you go to school in-state, and especially in the same town where your family is located, you can save a lot of money on the little things, like laundry, food, travel, and rent. Even if you decide that you don’t want to live with your parents, you will find that having them close will help you save money in the long run.

  1. Don’t forget about the unexpected

Unexpected situations pop up where you will need help and having family close will make it that much easier. If your car breaks down, you need help moving, or you just simply forgot to bring bring your homework to class, you will find that having family close will help to reduce the stress of the unexpected situations that come up.  

  1. Independence comes in many forms

Going out-of-state may offer a greater sense of independence, but that independence also comes with higher costs and a greater sense of responsibility. If your school doesn’t have dorms, consider renting an apartment with a couple of your friends that are going to the same in-state school as you. This can help you gain independence and save money doing so.

9 Questions to Ask Yourself About College Campuses Reply

college1If you’re planning on going to a physical college, then you’ve got to spend some time contemplating the college campuses. What do you want from them? How much do you really care about the place where you’re going to be studying?

If you’re not sure whether or not to go to a physical college or to use online college courses, then you’ve still got to ask yourself the same questions. Would you miss having an actual campus to walk around on? Would you rather not have to deal with the complications of a physical campus?

For students just getting started in their thinking about college, here are some key questions you should be asking yourself about college campuses.

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5 Ways To Examine Acceptance Rates Reply

spying glassOne of the pieces of information you’re likely to see called out about each and every college you look at is the college acceptance rate. This is the percentage of students who apply to the college and are actually accepted.

Lots of news reports focus on college admissions rates and what they mean, how they connect to the state of higher education as a whole. But what do they really mean for you, the student hoping to apply to these schools? How should they affect your college search? Here are 5 simple ways to understand and use college acceptance rates to improve your college search.

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3 Tips for Looking Ahead to Post-Graduation Before You’ve Applied Reply

GraduatesThere’s a slew of articles coming out now concerning the class of 2014 graduating from college. The articles talk about the issues they face, important facts of this class, and more. This article, in particular, paints a bleak picture of what faces these students post graduation.

Upon reading that, any number of reactions make sense. “It’s not worth going to college if I’m going to graduate with debt and unable to find a job,” goes one line of thinking. “I need to devote the entirety of my collegiate plans to making sure I’ll be able to get a good job after,” goes another.

So, what should you take away from this article? How should you look ahead to your post-graduation life? And how should it affect your college planning now, especially if you’re a junior in high school just getting started?

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Debt Versus Education: What You Need To Consider Reply

Education savingsGail Marksjarvis of the Chicago Tribune wrote this article (which is now unfortunately closed off to most viewers on the Chicago Tribune website), stating that students should consider debt when they decide what college to attend. In the past, we’ve argued that college shouldn’t be all about the bottom line, how much money you can make versus how much money you spend. That said, though? Gail Marksjarvis is right — you should consider debt when you decide what school to go to.

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5 Pluses and 5 Minuses about Online Education 1

Smiling confident businesswomanSo many are trying to figure out what the future of higher education will look like, when there are so many competing factors and difficulties. This Intelligence Squared debate is a great example of some of the competing tensions. It raises many, many good questions, and many potential answers. It’s worth listening to if you’ve any interest in where higher education is going. Below, you’ll find summaries of the 5 main advantages of online education, and the 5 main disadvantages of online education, as argued by the folks in the debate.
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Monday Link Roundup for Week of 12/2/13 Reply

P copyHello folks! I hope everyone had a wonderful Thanksgiving holiday and maybe even got some great deals shopping in the wee hours of the morning on Black Friday (I was most definitely not shopping but rather sleeping off my turkey binge from the evening before). Thanks to my colleague, Brendan Conway, for filling in with last week’s link roundup. This week, since today is Cyber Monday and I assume everyone is spending the entirety of the day online shopping, I’m going to do everything I can to distract you from discounted flat-screen TVs, tablets, and video games and instead turn your attention to some of the most interesting happenings in the world of college admissions. More…

Malcolm Gladwell’s David and Goliath and Your College Decision Reply

checkmateMalcolm Gladwell is one of those writers who is always interesting to read, whether or not there are flaws with his reasoning, argumentation, or evidence. If nothing else, his books always give you something to chew over. In his most recent book, David and Goliath, he puts forward the notion that students should not necessarily go to major, prestigious universities just to take advantage of that prestige. Instead, students should go to universities where they are likely to truly and notably excel. This Business Insider article does a pretty good job of summing up Gladwell’s argument, and critiquing that argument. So what should you do when you’re making decisions between schools, both for applications and for acceptances? Where should you aim yourself?

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