Graduate Dilemmas: How to Change Your College Mindset and Become a Professional Reply

College graduates are usually passionate and enthusiastic about the future. They dream of big careers and hope to reach top level positions. But they also face a number of dilemmas: How to make a shift from theory to practice? Can I handle the everyday routine? Is competition too strong for me?

The mind of a fresh graduate is burdened with all sorts of doubts. However, it’s not a mission impossible and there are many ways to successfully change your college mindset and become a professional. In this article, we are going to present the most efficient tips to help you get through the difficult period.

  • Set your professional objectives

Good students gain a lot of knowledge over years and then find it challenging to choose an adequate industry. Therefore, the priority is to set your professional objectives and decide to go in one direction. There are many factors to consider. For instance, you may think about the latest trends in business or current opportunities but your own affinities should play the key role in that regard. Follow your academic and intellectual intuition and you’ll be on the right path to choose the best niche.

  • Think about it on time

It will be difficult to adapt to the new situation without decent preparations. You should think about the career on time and conduct a little research about the jobs that you are interested in or the market in general. At the same time, it would be great to volunteer from time to time or apply for an internship within a large company. It will look good on your resume and give you the notion how it feels to work in a serious organization.

  • Start wide and then specialize

Young graduates start from scratch and slowly add practical experiences to their theoretical knowledge. At first, you will get a broad impression about the business but you will gradually specialize and deserve better position within the organization. Although it is a long-term process, be glad that you have a chance to put into practice what you have learned during college. Many people don’t have such good prospects but college graduates can count on higher earnings and better career achievements.

  • Use your knowledge

Although it’s crucial for you to accumulate enough experience and explore the details of your professional occupation, your fresh academic knowledge still give you the advantage over more experienced colleagues. Use the methods of evidence-based thinking, research, and teamwork to boost your career right from the start.

Just like Alex Downer, a career advisor at the writing service company, recently stated: “Contemporary college graduates have a few skills that were not too common back at the time. They are exceptionally good at public presentations and especially in writing, which is their biggest virtue. They should use this quality to grab the attention of supervisors and earn higher positions in the hierarchy.”

  • Improve your weak spots

Nobody’s perfect but for young people, it’s often very hard to admit their flaws and start dealing with them. You need to be honest and analyze your weaknesses objectively. Once you do this, you can work on it and improve your weak spots. For instance, if you are not fluent in a foreign language but really need it for the job, take private lessons or online courses.

  • Make use of social media

Today, employers don’t only explore your resume before hiring. They also look at your social media accounts to find out what kind of person they are dealing with. That’s why you need to update your digital profiles and add relevant information related to your academic background, volunteering, or previous work experiences. Obviously, the last thing you’d want is to be denied consideration based on your social media footprint.

  • Networking

Networking – both on and offline – can be essential for your career advancement. Even if you are not the friendliest person in the world, you have to grow the network of professional acquaintances to increase the chance of getting noticed.

  • Adapt to the corporate climate

All organizations, especially the biggest ones, have a strong corporate culture that employees must respect. On the other hand, young workers usually doubt general rules and call into question the basic principles of business. You should avoid making such mistakes because the methodology exists to make the company as a whole more functional. Be patient and adapt to the corporate climate – that’s the best thing you can do.

  • Find a mentor

Perhaps you are a genuine do-it-yourself player but our recommendation is to rely on more experienced colleagues in the beginning. Try to find a mentor or at least an advisor who will guide you through the early stages of your career. It should be the person you trust but also with huge practical experience. The mentor is there to help you learn the essentials of the business and eventually let you work independently.

  • Be ready to make improvisations

Professional career continuously brings unexpected issues that you must solve in short notice. Unlike the college – where everything runs according to the academic schedule – your job will be full of surprises. One of your duties will be to embrace the challenges, to see them as new opportunities, and then to look for solutions to the problems. It requires a full focus and improvisations skills but that’s exactly the beauty of real-life business.

  • Build personal image

People usually believe their first impressions so try to present yourself as an intellectual from the first day you enter your office. Build your personal image and try to look good whenever possible. Also dedicate some time to the sports and training – people will respect you simply for being fit. It works on a subconscious level in the minds of your colleagues but what matters the most is that it actually works.

  • Dream big but don’t just dream

Fresh graduates usually want it all and they want it immediately. However, it’s not easy to find a good position among so many talented peers and experienced colleagues. Be persistent and work hard. Don’t break down after mistakes – they are parts of the learning process. You should dream big and hope for the best but also work hard to achieve your objectives.

Conclusion

College graduation is a real crossroad in life as young people need to adapt to new circumstances and become serious professionals. In this article, we gave you some great tips how to deal with that – don’t hesitate to use our suggestions and prepare for the initial challenges in your career.


Sophia Anderson is an associate educator, blogger and freelance writer. She is passionate about covering topics on learning, writing, business, careers, self-improvement, motivation and others. She believes in the driving force of positive attitude and constant development. Talk to her on Facebook or LinkedIn.


All views and opinions of guest authors are theirs alone and are not representative of the views of Petersons.com or its parent company Nelnet.

Benefits of Starting a Business Before Graduation Reply

We all know the stories behind some of the most successful businesses – Frederick W. Smith founded FedEx while attending Yale University, while Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg revolutionized the world of technology with their businesses – Facebook, Napster, and Microsoft. Going to college with a business idea could be great for somebody who wants to launch their own company; you won’t have any other obligations besides classes to attend, so you’ll have enough time for developing that idea.

Here are some benefits you can get by starting your own business before graduation, and ways to get the most out of your education while working on your business plan.

1.  Learning from experience

The knowledge you’ll gain in the classroom is much different than the one you’ll gain outside of it. This is why the startup world can be a great link between theory and practice. Building your own company is often more complicated than studying for your university exams, but the things you’ll learn through experience are just as valuable as those you’ll learn from a book.

2. Mentoring

As a student, you can reach everyone. And by “everyone”, we mean the experienced professors at your university and successful entrepreneurs that can help and mentor you as you’re building your company. They usually love giving advice to young entrepreneurs, will try to make time for you, and will speak to you more openly because they won’t see you as a competition or some other kind of threat with ulterior motives.

3. Great rewards and low risk

By launching a startup while in college, there’s not much you can lose. In the worst-case scenario, you can always go back to studying. This may trick you into making a casual approach to launching a business, so you should beware of that. Those few years of college will be over in no time, and the risks will then be higher. You can start one business venture per year and see whether it’s going to work out for you. There’s enough time to start something new, quit, pivot, or get it right the first time. There are immense opportunities to test your ideas and turn your hobby into a business.

4. Accessible customers

If you want to test your business ideas while in college, other students can be a valuable resource. They’re your peers, they don’t ask for much, and if they don’t like what you have to offer – they’ll tell it like it is. Plus, if you manage to get them to pay for something, then you can be sure that your product or service is viable.

5. More opportunities

Starting a business in college is a great plus on your resume, even if the business fails. It shows that you’re creative, proactive, and driven, and it’s this kind of employees that successful companies look to hire. If you decide that you’re not ready to be an entrepreneur immediately after college, the startup experience you’ll have will open many doors for you and grant you many leadership opportunities with different companies.

6. Campus resources

There’s no need to pay for meeting rooms, consultations with professors, and an Internet connection when it’s all free and available to you on your college campus. Universities can provide many resources that you would otherwise have to pay for. In reality, you’re already paying for all of these through taxes or tuitions, so why not take advantage of them.

7. Safer future

Today, jobs are hard to find if we take the current economic climate into consideration. Expanding your reach beyond your campus can help you fight the possibility of unemployment after school. If your business keeps growing, your brand name could be heard by serious businessmen who could then hire you, as well as ensure the sustainability of your business.

The biggest benefit of starting a business before graduation is that you don’t have to give up if you’re not immediately successful. If your college business venture collapses, keep trying because there’s nothing to lose. By starting a business while still in college and consulting with other students and professors, you will get a creative head start and a valuable experience for the future.


Emma Miller is a marketer and a writer from Sydney. Her focus is digital marketing, social media, start-ups and latest trends. She’s a contributor at Bizzmark blog and a mother of two.


All views and opinions of guest authors are theirs alone and are not representative of the views of Petersons.com or its parent company Nelnet.

4 Educational Paths With High Placement Post-Graduation Reply

When deciding on an educational path, it’s always very helpful to look at placement rates after graduation. These rates vary by school, so choosing a quality, accredited school should be your first step. But once you’ve done that, it’s now time to choose a degree. This can be a difficult choice and there are a lot of factors that should be involved in making it, but if you’re interested in placement rates, these are the educational paths you should be looking into.

1. Computer Science

With practically every company now heavily relying on computers and computer networks, there is no shortage of jobs for computer science majors. Computer science majors can go into a number of specialties, including IT, programming and more. They can also go into areas such as web design and app programming, which are also hot career choices. If you enjoy working with computers, there’s hardly a better educational path.

2. Healthcare

Just about every degree in the healthcare field, from nursing to health information management, boasts high placement among graduates. The healthcare field is one of the fastest-growing sectors of the American economy and qualified applicants are snatched up right away to meet demand. The increased use of digital technology is what has seen an increase in the demand for health information management professionals. There is also an increasing demand for advanced nurse practitioners, so additional education, like a bsn to msn, can improve job prospects even further.

3. Accounting

Graduates who hold a degree in accounting have an average 61.2% job offer rate before graduation. That’s exceedingly high, and rivaled by only a couple of other degrees. Just about every company needs skilled accountants to manage their finances, so it should come as no surprise that this occupation is in demand. Quality accounting programs typically see high pass rates on the critical Certified Public Accountant exam as well.

4. Engineering

Engineering degrees of any kind are in high demand. The field is varied so there are options no matter your interests – for example, electrical engineers build electronic equipment and chemical engineers design the manufacturing process for a variety of items, including drugs and fuel. Engineering jobs also boast high salaries in general, which is another great benefit. This is an excellent career path to pursue if you love designing and building things.

While there are always a lot of factors that go into deciding what college degree you should choose, such as where your passion lies, it’s helpful to know what degrees are in heavy demand. All of the educational paths mentioned above have high placement rates post-graduation. They are also in varied fields, so there’s bound to be something you’re drawn to. If you’re worried about landing a job upon graduation, these degrees should alleviate those fears a little.


Emma is a freelance writer currently living in Boston, MA. She writes most often on education and business. To see more from Emma, say hi on Twitter @EmmaSturgis2 or Facebook.


All views and opinions of guest authors are theirs alone and are not representative of the views of Petersons.com or its parent company Nelnet.

7 Things You Must Do to Build a Successful Career After College Reply

While you were still at college, you couldn’t wait for graduation day. You’ve had some good times, that’s for sure. However, you were also stressed out about all those exams and papers. You were waiting for that moment when you could say “whoa, it’s over.”

Now, you’re faced in front of a whole new challenge. It’s the overwhelming feeling known among recent graduates as the “now what?”

Be ready to start looking for your first job as soon as possible! This process will be challenging, but exciting at the same time.

Today, we’ll list 7 things you must do when you’re trying to build a successful career right out of college.

  1. Make a Career Plan

Did you use the full potential of the career advising services at your university? If that was the case, then you already know how to make a career plan. If you weren’t interested to visit these offices, you can overcome that disadvantage.

Here’s what you need to do:

  • Envision where you want to be. Your education gives you few career options. If, for example, your major was psychology, you can work as an educational psychologist, high intensity therapist, counseling psychologist, and so on. You need a direction, so you’ll know where to start.
  • Consider the obstacles that prevent you from getting that job. For now, it’s the experience. You’ll get that through entry positions. What about education? Do you need certificates? Will you need a graduate degree? If that’s the case, your career plan will include entry positions in combination with studying.
  • What positions can lead you to the job of your dreams? How much time will you spend on your first job before you start making progress? It’s important to conduct a research to find out how you can get promotions. Make a list and a timeline.
  1. Clean Up Your Online Reputation

According to the results of CareerBuilder’s survey, 60% of employers research job candidates through social media networks. The online reputation of a particular candidate makes a huge difference in their decision.

It’s time to make your Instagram profile private. Delete all compromising Facebook photos and comments. Check what other people can see about you and take control. The tweets are important, too. You don’t want any offensive or silly content there.

  1. Start a Blog

What’s the best thing a recruiter could find when they google your name? A high-quality blog tackling topics from the specific industry.

Start that blog! If you still don’t have a job, then you have time for it.

Your posts have to be authoritative, 100% unique, and valuable for the target audience.

  1. Craft the Perfect Resume and Cover Letter                                                   

What does a hiring manager see when you apply for a job? A resume/CV and a cover letter.

They don’t know what kind of person you are. They don’t know your qualifications and interests. The job application documents have to give that information to an employer.

If you’re not confident in your resume writing skills, you can always hire a professional service. Just make sure to read the best resume services reviews, so you’ll find the right website for your needs.

  1. Create the Perfect LinkedIn Profile

Your LinkedIn profile tells a story to hiring managers. If the profile is good enough and you make plenty of contacts, you’ll be getting proposals without even sending applications.

According to the Jobvite Recruiter Nation Report 2016, 87% recruiters find Linkedin to be the most effective tool for vetting candidates during the hiring process. That’s how important this network is.

  • Your profile must be complete.
  • Don’t feature a selfie as the profile photo. You need a professional-looking headshot.
  • Connect with the right people. The most effective job seekers have robust networks. That’s what LinkedIn is all about: networking.
  • The content featured on your LinkedIn profile has to be good. The headline, in particular, is what gets a recruiter’s attention. Make sure there are no grammar or spelling errors throughout your page.
  1. Work on Your Self-Confidence

Chances are, you’ll face few disappointments on the way to your first job. Not many hiring managers will call for interviews. With this competition, it’s hard to get noticed. You must not let that affect your self-confidence.

You deserve a job. You will get it. Just keep applying to relevant ads. Until the moment you get the job, you have time for self-improvement. Work on new skills, take online courses, and volunteer. You’ll make your resume look better, but you’ll also feel more confident when you know more stuff.

  1. Stay on Track

This isn’t about getting any job. Building a career is something different.

You’ll need to set some standards. If possible, don’t accept any job, no matter what it is, just to pay the bills. If you do get such a job, make it temporary and keep looking for a relevant one.

A brilliant career doesn’t come easily. It’s a journey that leads you to the position you’ve envisioned. Hopefully, you’ll do the 7 things listed above and you’ll get there.


Stephanie Proper is a career advisor and blogger who through her articles helps people go through the application process. You can contact her via ProperResumesTwitter and Facebook.


All views and opinions of guest authors are theirs alone and are not representative of the views of Petersons.com or its parent company Nelnet.

Planning for the Future: 6 Ways to Get Ahead When You’re a Recent College Grad Reply

If you’ve recently graduated from school, now is the time to start thinking about the future. You might be focused on landing that dream job, but what happens after that?

It’s important to think about this stuff as early as possible because finances can be a major source of stress further down the road. In some cases, those who haven’t carefully planned find themselves depressed (or worse). Having a plan in place will reduce your stress level and allow you to stay motivated, so take time to sit down and think about what your goals are. Financial planning may not be fun, but it’s a necessary part of life. Talk to people who have lived through it–your parents, grandparents, or an older friend–and get some advice on where to begin.

After that, use these 6 tips to start planning for the future

1. Explore your options

Now is the time to figure out what you really want when it comes to a job, a house, and a stable future. Do you want to do some traveling? Start saving for retirement? It’s all possible, but now is the time to strike. Look at your career options and don’t be afraid to take some risks.

“Your 20s really are the time to explore. Before you get married and before you have kids, you don’t have a lot of financial responsibilities,” says author Jean Chatzky.

2. Consider living rent-free

If it’s an option, consider living with your parents or other family members just after graduation. This is a short-term situation that could help you save money for a car or your first place. Just remember to stay motivated where money saving is concerned, otherwise you’ll get a little too comfortable and it will be harder for you to get out on your own.

3. Watch your credit

Your credit score might not mean much now, but when you’re ready to buy a house or a car, it will be a very important part of your life. If you have student loans, start paying them off as soon as possible and add a little extra to your monthly payment to get ahead. Credit cards should be used for big purchases or emergencies only to avoid running up debt. Taking care of your credit now means you’ll have much more stability in the future.

4. Make saving automatic

Saving money is much easier if you don’t even have to think about it, so consider investing in a 401(k) plan that your employer takes out of your paycheck. This means you’ll have a plan for retirement that requires no effort on your part, and since it’s taken right out of your check you won’t even miss it.

5. Have a backup plan

Even if you’ve already secured your dream job, it’s always a good idea to have a backup plan just in case. Keep your resume updated and make connections with other people in your field so you can always have an ear to the ground. Even the best jobs can come with nasty surprises, or you may find that you just don’t enjoy it as much as you thought you would.

6. Earn extra money

Whether you already have a day job or are trying to score one, it may be necessary to earn a little extra money now and then, so consider putting your skills to use as a tutor, a babysitter, or a dog walker. You can start your own business making jewelry, or maintain a blog that earns money through ads.

Saving and planning for the future doesn’t have to be an overwhelming experience; start with a plan and talk to some people who have been through it already to gain some insight. After that, it’s just a matter of staying focused.


Gloria runs WomenLed.org, which celebrates women’s achievements in the workplace and beyond. She believes that while women have made many advancements toward “shattering the glass ceiling,” there is still much to be done. It is her aim to help increase the number of women-led businesses by educating others about the topic.


All views and opinions of guest authors are theirs alone and are not representative of the views of Petersons.com or its parent company Nelnet.

Women: Advance your Career before Donning the Cap and Gown Reply

For most college students, graduation can’t come soon enough. This is especially true for young women eager to show the men of the world that they are every bit as capable in their chosen careers. However, in a time when employment rates are at historic lows, snagging a position is easier said than done. On average, bachelor’s-degree-holding young adults job hunt for six months. In male-dominated industries, such as construction and finance, that search can last considerably longer.

According to Kiplinger Editor Janet Bodnar, teenagers have difficulty walking into entry-level opportunities as many experienced candidates vie for positions. But there are things you can do right now to improve your chances of walking the line and then straight through the doors of your dream job.

Scout for prospective jobs once you decide on a major

There is no need to wait until your diploma is in hand to put your feelers out and see what types of jobs are available for people with your degree. Many colleges offer student-run consulting groups to help students in each industry pick the perfect profession. As well, you can check your campus placement office and local job listings monthly to see what’s out there. If you’re not yet ready to apply, at least file away in your mind companies you might like to target later on.

Choose your major wisely

It is not simply enough these days to hold a degree in an open-ended discipline, such as philosophy or liberal arts. In order to secure the highest-paying positions, you must pick your major strategically. Degrees in technology, public relations, and marketing are in high demand. These skills can be used across a breadth of industries, making you more hirable than other candidates.

Network early and network often

Yes, even college students – and in some cases high school students – should have a professional networking profile for use on social media sites, such as LinkedIn. However, while online networking may be most comfortable, you should also join organizations where you can make personal contact with hiring managers and other professionals who can help you get your foot in the door. If you’re getting close to graduation and have a city in mind, it’s a great idea to spend a week or two there, set up shop, and schedule a few interviews in advance. Immersing yourself in a networking community will connect you to a group of knowledgeable industry veterans and create new opportunities and experiences related to your chosen field.

Don’t ignore the power of an internship

Real-world experience in your desired profession goes a long way, especially when coupled with proven academic prowess. When looking at candidates with identical degrees, most hiring managers will grant a coveted interview with those who’ve proven they can perform their desired job.

Work on your soft skills

Soft skills, those that don’t seemingly affect your job, are vital to your overall success. Things such as communication and customer service skills can lead you further down your chosen career path.

Job hunting tips

Before you ever go to your first interview, it is important to polish your face-to-face skills. Go ahead and outfit your wardrobe with a few key pieces, including some classic black pumps, which pair well with any outfit. Make sure you know exactly what the company does and what the role requires. Don’t ask the interviewer questions that you could’ve easily found the answer to on your own. Instead, show a genuine interest in the culture of the company. Speaking of the interviewer, make sure to remember their name(s) – there is nothing more embarrassing than calling your future boss Carol when her name is Cindy. Be polite, courteous, and succinct in your answers. Maintain an air of professionalism at all times…even while sitting in the waiting room. Finally, don’t be afraid to tell the interviewer that you believe you are a strong candidate, that you’re interested in the position, and that you would welcome the opportunity for a second sit down session.


Gloria runs WomenLed.org, which celebrates women’s achievements in the workplace and beyond. She believes that while women have made many advancements toward “shattering the glass ceiling,” there is still much to be done. It is her aim to help increase the number of women-led businesses by educating others about the topic.


All views and opinions of guest authors are theirs alone and are not representative of the views of Petersons.com or its parent company Nelnet.

Words and Phrases to Take Off of Your Resume for Next Semester Reply

By: Francine Fluetsch, Uloop

As we begin to enjoy our winter break, we start to find that we might have more time on our hands than we know what to do with. Sure, this is your time to relax and do nothing for some of the days, but it’s also a good idea to use some of your time away from school to get some work done.

Young smiling man holding his resume applying for a job

Young smiling man holding his resume applying for a job

A great place to start would be tidying up your resume for next semester. Maybe you want to get it ready for an internship, a new job, get it ready for graduation, you name it!

Now, “tidying” seems like such a broad term, so where should you start? Well, once you have all the content that you want on there, it’s time to go through the editing process. You want to make every word count, and exchange some words that employers just don’t want to see on there.

Let’s look at some examples so you’ll be able to avoid these wordy mistakes and, as a result, make your resume the best that it can be.

Clichés:

Think about it: hiring managers have to look at hundreds of resumes, so they will start to see patterns of common things that potential employees like to put on their resumes to supposedly “stand out.”

The problem is, if you are using clichéd job terms like “I’m a hard worker,” you are putting down what hundreds of other people are, and by doing so, aren’t standing out.

Instead of putting the words “I’m a hard worker,” show this! It’s the same thing that we writers are told again and again — you need to show, not tell.

I found some helpful guidance in this article by Rachel Gillett. She quotes Mary Lorenz, a corporate communications manager at CareerBuilder, who sheds a bit more light on this subject.

“Anyone can say they are ‘best of breed,’ a ‘go-getter,’ a ‘hard worker,’ or a ‘strategic thinker,” making these terms unoriginal, and ultimately, hindering you more than they will help you.

Lorenz continues, “Employers want to know what makes the job seekers unique, and how they will add value to the specific organization for which they’re applying.”

This again is alluding to the fact that you need to demonstrate your worth, not just write a clichéd sentence about it.

Superfluous words:

My partner was taking an online career class, and they discussed how when you are writing your resume, you should always use active verbs when describing yourself and your experiences. I’d never really thought about it before, but it makes a lot of sense. It gets to the point of what you have accomplished, and doesn’t cloud your resume or confuse the hiring manager about what your previous positions actually entailed.

Alyssa Gelbard, founder and president of Résumé Strategists, says that superfluous words like “responsible for,” “oversight of,” and “duties included,” unnecessarily complicate and hide your experience. To avoid this, she too suggests the use of active verbs.

Ex: Replace: “Responsible for training interns” with “Train interns.”

This will save room on your resume, so you can pack everything in, and will show hiring managers exactly what you want to show them.

Team player:

Business Insider and Forbes both agree that this cliché has got to go. Obviously you need to be a team player, or you won’t get the job, but you need to show your team playing ability, not just type those words and call it good.

An article in Forbes, by Nick DeSantis, suggests the following.

“If your intention is to communicate how well you work with others, giving examples of your roles within collaborative projects will be far more impressionable on a resume.”

Again, showing, and not telling, will help you land the job and look more impressive.

Self-motivated:

Everyone likes to put that they are self-motivated on their resume (guilty as charged), but what weight does that hold? In order to receive a job, this quality should be a guarantee, not a resume booster. What I’m saying is, you want to use the space on your resume to highlight your initiative and work ethic, rather than just saying you are self-motivated. It won’t help you stand out and it is not specific enough or defining in any way. The more you know, right?

Proactive:

The Forbes article also recommends taking the word “proactive” out of your resume. Being proactive is great, but highlighting it to your potential employer doesn’t do all that much because, like being “self- motivated,” this should be a no brainer, and will be a quality that everyone who lands a job will have, thus making it pointless to attach on your resume.

These are just a few examples on what to avoid on your resume when you are polishing it. Bottom line, you need to be specific, give examples, be unique, and think like a hiring manager to avoid clichés. Good luck!


Visit uloop.com for more college news and to search for off-campus housing, tutors near campus, jobs for college students, and more.


All views and opinions of guest authors are theirs alone and are not representative of the views of Petersons.com or its parent company Nelnet.

4 Surprising Degrees That Can Launch Your Career into Upper Management Reply

4-surprising-degrees-that-can-launch-your-career-into-upper-managementSo you are eyeing a career in upper management. You want to be the boss, call the shots, and lead a company to success. While a business degree might be a more straightforward option, there are a number of other, lesser-known degrees that can launch a career into upper management at a high rate.

1. English

The skills learned when acquiring an English degree are some of the most crucial for business success and can even put you on the fast track towards upper management positions. For example, English majors learn how to speak and write well, as well as debate and negotiate—all things upper-level managers have to be able to do well. They also know how to present themselves in the best possible light and think critically, which makes them valued members of a company and puts them in a much better position to be promoted to upper management. English majors also have to be able to communicate well, especially with the written word, which makes them prime candidates for management and leadership positions who have to complete written tasks when managing their teams and employees.

2. Public Administration

Public administration is essentially the public sector version of the business degree. It teaches many of the same things, from economics and law to leadership skills. Your upper management dreams might not be found in the business world, but in the public sector, where you could work for and manage a municipality. While you can find jobs with a bachelor’s degree in this field, a master’s degree opens many more options, and online master’s degree in public administration programs can provide a higher level of flexibility for working professionals. Public administration careers are in demand, and they really are a great place to combine business background with further education and knowledge.

3. Human Resources

HR professionals can become top executives within their company. Since management is really all about managing people, a degree in human resource management might be a good fit for many people-oriented individuals. In this field, you will oversee the hiring of new staff, manage issues with existing staff, and consult with other executives on company planning and policy. HR managers are also expected to enjoy faster than average job growth in the coming years per the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

4. Accounting

While business majors take accounting and finance classes, a more in-depth option is available if you want to become an executive financial manager. Financial managers often get a seat at the same table as the CEO during meetings and play a direct role in an organization’s success. Responsibilities might include directing investments, planning out a company’s long-term financial prospects, creating reports and making financial recommendations to other executive managers.

Getting into an upper management position can take a few years or more of hard work and working your way up the corporate ladder, and having a strong educational experience behind you can help you along tremendously. If you want your career to include time spent in upper management, it is important to remember to prepare before you start your career. Choose a career that has growth opportunities for the future, or start with a job that will give you experience to get jobs that have growth opportunities. Unexpected things happen in a career all the time, but it can be nice to have a tentative future plan, with room for changes. Above we discussed four careers that can help provide you with the skills and background that are necessary and sought out for in upper level management positions.


Emma is a freelance writer currently living in Boston, MA. She writes most often on education and business. To see more from Emma, say hi on Twitter @EmmaSturgis2 or Facebook.


All views and opinions of guest authors are theirs alone and are not representative of the views of Petersons.com or its parent company Nelnet.

Your Social Profile and Your Career Reply

Kiev, Ukraine - January 11, 2016: Background of famous social media icons such as: Facebook, Twitter, Blogger, Linkedin, Tumblr, Myspace and others, printed on paper.

Repeat after me:

All of social media matters. Facebook. Flickr. Instagram. Pinterest. Medium. Linkedin. Snap Chat. Twitter. Vimeo. YouTube. These sites and others are important in a job search. Without the boring, parental or punitive tone, let’s quickly explore why. Over the last few years social media has become more of a factor in candidates being excluded from consideration.

And even if ones’ profile is password protected, I’ve seen that go south rather quickly. Having supported some of the best brands on the planet, it is not foreign to request login credentials. Worst, there are websites that archive social media traffic and portray your digital contributions and pictures oftentimes unknowingly.  I know that cruel internet.

All things considered, this is a critical time for you. You, your parents and other family members have invested resources and time in this educational journey. All of such so that you might secure a fantastic new role with a promising organization. The last thing you’d want is to be denied consideration based on your social media footprint. Let’s rethink your next post.

So before you fire off that resume or pop up for the next scheduled interview, let’s assume everything can and/or will be seen by the person you are scheduled to meet. As a Recruiter, I put each candidate through a quick social media forensic exercise. Here’s what we look for:

Linkedin

  • Photo should be clean, professional, visible – captured via camera if possible
  • Profile should be complete, include details, and paint a picture of who you are
  • Contact information of some sort should be visible – a social media handle or other

Instagram

  • Post pictures that are not offensive or frowned upon by the employer
  • Be conscious of who you follow and or whose pictures you “like” in the process
  • Algorithms are always tweaked too the advantage of the host – not you – be mindful

Twitter

  • Measure your emotion in those 140 characters – don’t always hit send (immediately)
  • Use tools to distribute thoughtful updates and filter questionable content
  • Respect that social recruiting (follows, hashtags, likes, etc) are methods of finding you

Soundcloud

  • Record a crisp introduction to be shared via email/social media with employers
  • Briefly cover defining characteristics, an impact example(s) and contact information
  • Separate yourself from the average job seeker that sits at a keyboard and hits enter

I’m not suggesting you can’t have fun, or post incredible pictures from an office party, or holiday weekend. In fact, I encourage that. I’m asking that you reconsider if the post or tweet will have any potential impact on your mission. I’m suggesting to you that as a recruiter, I’m able to uncover more about you with your email address than you might know.

I’m saying think twice – tweet that. Truth is, a part of your brand will be created through your decision to say no. Progress require a critical injection of confidence and an elevated level of awareness beyond these artificial boundaries of acceptance established by others. Try this slogan: I’m comfortable is the old 20!


About Torin Ellis:

Human Capital Strategist // Interview Architect // Diversity Maverick // Engaging and high spirited. Creative, high voltage, ready to pursue results. Author of Rip The Resume available on petersons.com and where books are sold.


All views and opinions of guest authors are theirs alone and are not representative of the views of Petersons.com or its parent company Nelnet.

Your “After College” Survival Guide: How to Survive as a Fresh College Graduate Reply

Saving for educationBeth Bowman graduated college bubbling with excitement. She had accrued over $25,000 in student debts, but it didn’t matter because she felt she was pursuing a degree that will help her land her dream job of being a cultural consultant for a non-governmental organization. Now out of college, she was excited about her prospects.

However, Bowman soon realized the hard way that we don’t live in a perfect world. After sending about 500 job applications — to which she got no response — she now manages at a job as a policy administration specialist, a job that does not require a college degree.

Bowman’s story isn’t an isolated example.

Statistics from Pew Research Center show that it is becoming increasingly harder for college graduates to find good jobs: a whopping 44 percent of college graduates work at jobs that don’t require a college degree, and 20 percent of college graduates work in low-wage jobs that pay below $25,000. That obviously doesn’t justify today’s average student debt of $37,172.

Here are some survival tips to help you cope as a fresh college graduate:

  1. Make Preparations before Graduating College: Considering the difficulties in getting quality jobs faced by college graduates today, it is best to start making preparations before graduating college. Research shows that employers still value job experience — and having experience as a paid intern makes things even better.

The good news is that you don’t have to be out of college to get relevant job experience. You can still intern while in college; look for relevant organizations that have internship organizations for you while you’re still in college, and slowly build up your work experience. By the time you graduate, you don’t have to be disadvantaged due to lack of work experience.

  1. Get Creative About Job Applications: As a fresh graduate, don’t assume that you can get hired by applying to advertised jobs. Some sources show that up to 80 percent of jobs are unadvertised.

Instead:

  • Regularly reach out to family and friends to inquire about unadvertised job openings they know of.
  • Avoid having your life story on your cover letter. Research shows that recruiters spend less than 10 seconds going through it. Keep your cover letter short and simple.
  • Don’t ignore the internet in your job search. Apparently, 80 percent of recruiters have hired people through LinkedIn. Create and polish your LinkedIn profile.
  • Don’t just wait while you try to get hired. Take advantage of technology to accelerate your prospect of getting hired: you can start a blog or create a simple website. Case studies abound of people who got hired through their blog/website, and many said employers were wowed more by their blogs than by their degree.
  1. Pursue Side Jobs and Alternate Career Options: Many college graduates wait for years, sending hundreds of job applications, without getting their dream job and spending all that time doing nothing. This eventually leads to depression.

Get creative about other ways to earn while looking for your dream job. You can easily find side jobs that will help you sustain yourself while pursuing desirable job opportunities; income from these side jobs reduce pressure on you and help cater to some of your day to day responsibilities.


About John Stevens

John Stevens is an entrepreneur and founder of HostingFacts.com, an online portal that reviews web hosts. He is a regular contributor to Standford’s blog, Business Insider, Entrepreneur.com and other major publications. Follow him on Twitter @hostingfactsj.


All views and opinions of guest authors are theirs alone and are not representative of the views of Petersons.com or its parent company Nelnet.