Your Social Profile and Your Career Reply

Kiev, Ukraine - January 11, 2016: Background of famous social media icons such as: Facebook, Twitter, Blogger, Linkedin, Tumblr, Myspace and others, printed on paper.

Repeat after me:

All of social media matters. Facebook. Flickr. Instagram. Pinterest. Medium. Linkedin. Snap Chat. Twitter. Vimeo. YouTube. These sites and others are important in a job search. Without the boring, parental or punitive tone, let’s quickly explore why. Over the last few years social media has become more of a factor in candidates being excluded from consideration.

And even if ones’ profile is password protected, I’ve seen that go south rather quickly. Having supported some of the best brands on the planet, it is not foreign to request login credentials. Worst, there are websites that archive social media traffic and portray your digital contributions and pictures oftentimes unknowingly.  I know that cruel internet.

All things considered, this is a critical time for you. You, your parents and other family members have invested resources and time in this educational journey. All of such so that you might secure a fantastic new role with a promising organization. The last thing you’d want is to be denied consideration based on your social media footprint. Let’s rethink your next post.

So before you fire off that resume or pop up for the next scheduled interview, let’s assume everything can and/or will be seen by the person you are scheduled to meet. As a Recruiter, I put each candidate through a quick social media forensic exercise. Here’s what we look for:


  • Photo should be clean, professional, visible – captured via camera if possible
  • Profile should be complete, include details, and paint a picture of who you are
  • Contact information of some sort should be visible – a social media handle or other


  • Post pictures that are not offensive or frowned upon by the employer
  • Be conscious of who you follow and or whose pictures you “like” in the process
  • Algorithms are always tweaked too the advantage of the host – not you – be mindful


  • Measure your emotion in those 140 characters – don’t always hit send (immediately)
  • Use tools to distribute thoughtful updates and filter questionable content
  • Respect that social recruiting (follows, hashtags, likes, etc) are methods of finding you


  • Record a crisp introduction to be shared via email/social media with employers
  • Briefly cover defining characteristics, an impact example(s) and contact information
  • Separate yourself from the average job seeker that sits at a keyboard and hits enter

I’m not suggesting you can’t have fun, or post incredible pictures from an office party, or holiday weekend. In fact, I encourage that. I’m asking that you reconsider if the post or tweet will have any potential impact on your mission. I’m suggesting to you that as a recruiter, I’m able to uncover more about you with your email address than you might know.

I’m saying think twice – tweet that. Truth is, a part of your brand will be created through your decision to say no. Progress require a critical injection of confidence and an elevated level of awareness beyond these artificial boundaries of acceptance established by others. Try this slogan: I’m comfortable is the old 20!

About Torin Ellis:

Human Capital Strategist // Interview Architect // Diversity Maverick // Engaging and high spirited. Creative, high voltage, ready to pursue results. Author of Rip The Resume available on and where books are sold.

All views and opinions of guest authors are theirs alone and are not representative of the views of or its parent company Nelnet.

Your “After College” Survival Guide: How to Survive as a Fresh College Graduate Reply

Saving for educationBeth Bowman graduated college bubbling with excitement. She had accrued over $25,000 in student debts, but it didn’t matter because she felt she was pursuing a degree that will help her land her dream job of being a cultural consultant for a non-governmental organization. Now out of college, she was excited about her prospects.

However, Bowman soon realized the hard way that we don’t live in a perfect world. After sending about 500 job applications — to which she got no response — she now manages at a job as a policy administration specialist, a job that does not require a college degree.

Bowman’s story isn’t an isolated example.

Statistics from Pew Research Center show that it is becoming increasingly harder for college graduates to find good jobs: a whopping 44 percent of college graduates work at jobs that don’t require a college degree, and 20 percent of college graduates work in low-wage jobs that pay below $25,000. That obviously doesn’t justify today’s average student debt of $37,172.

Here are some survival tips to help you cope as a fresh college graduate:

  1. Make Preparations before Graduating College: Considering the difficulties in getting quality jobs faced by college graduates today, it is best to start making preparations before graduating college. Research shows that employers still value job experience — and having experience as a paid intern makes things even better.

The good news is that you don’t have to be out of college to get relevant job experience. You can still intern while in college; look for relevant organizations that have internship organizations for you while you’re still in college, and slowly build up your work experience. By the time you graduate, you don’t have to be disadvantaged due to lack of work experience.

  1. Get Creative About Job Applications: As a fresh graduate, don’t assume that you can get hired by applying to advertised jobs. Some sources show that up to 80 percent of jobs are unadvertised.


  • Regularly reach out to family and friends to inquire about unadvertised job openings they know of.
  • Avoid having your life story on your cover letter. Research shows that recruiters spend less than 10 seconds going through it. Keep your cover letter short and simple.
  • Don’t ignore the internet in your job search. Apparently, 80 percent of recruiters have hired people through LinkedIn. Create and polish your LinkedIn profile.
  • Don’t just wait while you try to get hired. Take advantage of technology to accelerate your prospect of getting hired: you can start a blog or create a simple website. Case studies abound of people who got hired through their blog/website, and many said employers were wowed more by their blogs than by their degree.
  1. Pursue Side Jobs and Alternate Career Options: Many college graduates wait for years, sending hundreds of job applications, without getting their dream job and spending all that time doing nothing. This eventually leads to depression.

Get creative about other ways to earn while looking for your dream job. You can easily find side jobs that will help you sustain yourself while pursuing desirable job opportunities; income from these side jobs reduce pressure on you and help cater to some of your day to day responsibilities.

About John Stevens

John Stevens is an entrepreneur and founder of, an online portal that reviews web hosts. He is a regular contributor to Standford’s blog, Business Insider, and other major publications. Follow him on Twitter @hostingfactsj.

All views and opinions of guest authors are theirs alone and are not representative of the views of or its parent company Nelnet.

Back to school: Tips and tools to get prepared Reply

Rear view of teenage students walking together on university campus. Horizontal shot.

As the big day gets closer, the day you start college for the first time, it’s important to make sure you’re organised, and you have every box ticked.

It is daunting, but starting college is an adventure, and something which you should approach as a fun, positive step in your life.

Paperwork done?

You probably did some sort of paperwork previously to even get into college, but having been accepted, have you signed all the forms for your accommodation? Do you need to send anything off in terms of money or bursaries? Is there any other piece of paper lurking that you haven’t sent off yet?

Pack up your life

You need to take many things with you as you leave home, but this is no easy task! Bear in mind that many dorm rooms are small, basic, and usually furnished, but you can easily make it homely. Pack light, but effectively. You can buy many things once you arrive, such as bedding and towels etc.

Get sociable

When it comes to meeting your new roommates/neighbours, don’t be shy! You need to create bonds early on, which will make your college life easier, and more fun overall. There will be many activities during Fresher’s Week – get involved.

Readjust your sleeping pattern

Summertime is over, and that means long mornings in bed are finished! In the week leading up to your leaving day, try and adjust your body clock to getting up when you would at college. This all means it’s less likely to be a huge shock when the event occurs.

Budgeting will see you through

This is something you can start getting used to in the weeks leading up to your college start date – budgeting. During your college life you are going to need to organise your money, in order to make sure that everything gets paid, and that you have enough to enjoy yourself. Ask for advice, speak to your parents, basically organise your money and stick to it.

Search for new study tools to use

When reaching for that perfect mark, you have to think a little outside the box. Thankfully there are many study tools to help.

  • Etherpad – If you are collaborating with other students on a project, it can be difficult to send work back and forth – this particular tool means you can collaborate online and share content easily, minimising oversights.
  • Getkahoo – Learning can be fun. You can work with other students or alone, and the multiple choice quizzes will help cement your previous learning, or help you with a subject you’re struggling on.
  • Boomessays – Academic writing doesn’t come that naturally to everyone, and in that case, a writing consultant is the way to go. This site helps you put together that perfect essay.
  • Haikulearning – Sharing knowledge is the perfect way to help others and help yourself. Here you can create pages and publish your knowledge, whilst also accessing content from other users online too.
  • The Homework App – If you need help organising yourself and your studies, this is a handy app on your iPhone or iPad which will make your life infinitely easier.
  • Mindmeister – We mentioned sharing before, but collaborating with other users can be just as effective. You can share ideas in a visual way on this site, which helps you gain ideas for your own college work.
  • Essayroo – Aussie students can access online tutor help from highly trained professionals in their particular field on this site.

These tips should help you on your way to your first day at college, without a hitch.

About Gloria Kopp

Gloria Kopp is a web content writer and an e-learning consultant from Manville city. She graduated from the University of Wyoming and started a career of a creative writer. She has recently launched her Studydemic educational website and is currently working as a freelance writer and editor.

All views and opinions of guest authors are theirs alone and are not representative of the views of or its parent company Nelnet.

Should Startups Hire New MBA Grads? Reply

StartupNew Economy, New MBA

Back in the day, MBAs were sort of for losers. People who weren’t successful in their business pursuits went to business school to gain new schools with the hope of improving their business acumen. The logic was simple back then: if you were good at business, you stayed in business. But our economy has shifted and so have many business schools in terms of how their MBA programs are shaped and whom they accept into their programs.

Many business schools are now places for networking, innovation, and learning hard skills that serve core business functions (the stuff that hasn’t changed very much). In short, MBAs are walking out of their business schools more connected, more creative, and more prepared than the average individual with a few years of work experience but lacking an MBA. Many MBAs take the advantage of their time in school making connections and thinking broadly by creating startups of their own with their colleagues.

Getting wiseMBA

The beauty of the new frontier for MBA students is that they are primed for innovation as they leave the incredibly formative experience that is graduate school. Increasingly, entrepreneurship is one of the most appealing concentrations for students in business school. Nothing spells new horizons like putting in your few years at some firm, becoming a student again, then stepping back into the world of work. MBA students are eager to apply their learning and leverage their newfound connections on behalf of whatever project will help them make their mark. And we are beginning to see startups catch on.

Startups are hungry for that balance of innovative energy alongside hard skills that keep the company’s wheels turning on a daily basis. They need a constant infusion of fresh thinking along with the ability to execute on those bright ideas. In so doing, startups operate with some degree of consistent churn among their employees, which can be seen as a strong quality assuming that the company is still meeting its internal goals.

No longer risk-averse

Whether it is a generational shift or a product of business schools shifting their admissions and programmatic priorities, today’s typical MBA student is no longer as risk averse as MBA students in past years. Indeed, MBA students are arguably going to business school to mitigate the risks in our hyper-competitive economy. They are quite literally building the networks and acquiring the skills they believe they will need to survive in the business world precisely because they wish to advance in that world. To them, not improving their standing with MBA is an even greater risk than leaving the security of their pre-MBA job.

This is an ideal reality for startups. As they themselves get smarter about risks–in order to reduce the remarkably high failure rate for startups–they find themselves with a fresh crop of MBA students to draw from, year to year, to fuel their potential success. Alongside this trend, we have business schools and MBA students themselves working hard to make MBA degrees as valuable as possible in our modern economy given its ever-shifting context. An ideal match if there ever was one.

About Vera Marie Reed

Vera Marie Reed is an ex-elementary school teacher turned freelance writer from Glendale, California. She is now a stay at home mother to her two young daughters and enjoys writing about education and parenting issues. She hopes one day to write and illustrate a series of children’s books. Follow her on Twitter at @VMReed.

All views and opinions of guest authors are theirs alone and are not representative of the views of or its parent company Nelnet.

10 Body Language Tips for Your College Interview Reply

Having a successful college interview means more than just saying the right things and having a great digital resume, having the right body language is extremely important too. Non-verbal cues can convey a message stronger than your actual words since they can often be unintentional yet express your true meaning. Here is a list of the 10 body language tips for your college interview.

  1. Sit firmly back in seat

Sit up straight

Sitting all the way back and firmly in your seat not only shows that you have great posture, but also that you are confident. It gives a sense that you are comfortable and relaxed and ready to tackle any tough question that might get thrown your way.

  1. Keep feet on the ground

Planted feet shows that you are secure and steady. Since your feet are planted on the ground literally, it can figuratively mean that you practice sound judgement and good common sense, which any college interviewer would look for in a prospective student. Also, it has been scientifically proven that you can respond to questions more creatively and with more complex answers with both feet on the ground.

  1. Make and maintain eye contact – but don’t stare

Maintain eye contact
Making eye contact shows that you are being direct. Maintaining eye contact shows that you are listening and engaged to your interviewer. Even without speaking, proper eye contact shows that you are an active participant in the conversation. However, while you should maintain eye contact, you should not stare. According to Forbes, this can be interpreted as aggressive and even creepy.

  1. Gesture with your hands

It can often feel awkward to hold your hands still while talking, so it’s okay to use your hands to gesture while you speak. It can show that you are passionate about what you are talking about, which would be impressive to any college interviewer. Just be cognizant of your gestures, so don’t point in an aggressive manner.

  1. Palms up means honesty

According to Mashable, putting your palms up conveys honesty and engagement and can actually make the interviewer feel more comfortable. If the interviewer is more comfortable, this can cause you to relax, as well, making for a better and stronger interview.

  1. Nod while listening

Slightly nodding while listening is a great way to send the message that you’re listening, without actually speaking and interrupting your interviewer. Nodding at key moments drives home the fact that you’re engaged. Just remember not to overdo it and nod at every single word your interviewer has to say.

  1. Lean slightly forward

Leaning forward slightly during your interview can show that you’re listening intently. It’s also reducing some of the space between you and the interviewer, which can make things more relaxed and comfortable.

  1. Don’t cross arms

Crossing your arms can seem like a defensive mood, where you can seem off-putting to your interviewer. It’s better to keep your arms at your sides to seem more relaxed and personable. You want to seem open and approachable during your interview.

  1. No hands behind back

Don’t keep your hands behind your back at any point; it can seem as if you have something to hide. Place your hands lightly in your lap while not speaking or gesture with them while talking as cues that you are engaged throughout your interview.

  1. Make sure tone and expression match

You could send mixed signals to your interviewer if you are speaking passionately, while having a deadpan expression on your face. This can signify that you don’t believe what you are saying. Therefore, make sure that both your tone and expression match to convincingly get across what you are saying is exactly what you mean and how you honestly feel.

About Vera Marie Reed

Vera Marie Reed is an ex-elementary school teacher turned freelance writer from Glendale, California. She is now a stay at home mother to her two young daughters and enjoys writing about education and parenting issues. She hopes on day to write and illustrate a series of children’s books. Follow her on Twitter at @VMReed.

All views and opinions of guest authors are theirs alone and are not representative of the views of or its parent company Nelnet.

How Important Are Test Scores in College Admissions? 2

With the recent trend of more colleges going test optional, you may think that test scores have become less important in college admissions, but this isn’t exactly the case. The reality is there are many schools and many categories of students for whom test scores remain to be very important. So let’s break it down.

Why Test Scores are Still Important

Currently, there are over 850 colleges and universities in the United States that are test-optional, or “test-flexible” in some capacity, but these make up less than ⅓ of the 4-year colleges and universities in the country. SAT and ACT scores are considered by many institutions to be the most effective data points we have right now to compare students from different high schools and different parts of the country. These tests are not perfect, by any means, and they do not accurately assess many of the intelligences and skills a student might bring to a school, but, for better or worse, they are what colleges have right now to use as an equalizing factor. And so they will remain an important component in admissions at many schools, particularly large institutions. Even many schools that appear to be test-optional are not truly test-optional for all students. They may require other testing in lieu of the traditional SAT or ACT, such as AP or IB scores, or they may require scores from student athletes and students seeking scholarships even if they aren’t required in general admissions.

Test Scores are More Important at Some Schools than Others

Every higher ed institution ranks the factors it considers in admissions from “very important”, to “important”, to “considered”, to “not considered”, and you can find this information online in college profiles. For example, Yale lists test scores as “very important,” the University of Michigan lists them as “important,” and Harvard lists them as “considered.” But because this information is self-reported, you have to take it with a grain of salt (Harvard boasts some of the highest test scores in the country, after all). Test scores are also calculated into U.S. News and World Report rankings, so this puts additional pressure on schools seeking higher rankings to increase the average SAT score of their admitted students.

Still…Test Scores are Just One Factor in Admissions

Knowing how important test scores are to certain institutions can give you valuable insight into the level of scrutiny that your SAT or ACT score report might face, but it is also important to keep in mind that scores are only one factor in admissions. Most institutions consider your high school transcript and GPA to be the most important component in admissions and also consider other elements such as essays, teacher and peer recommendations, extracurricular activities, and personal obstacles. This is a good thing for students who feel that their test scores do not best represent them, but it also means that students should realize that test scores might be even more competitive at their dream schools than they realize. Say a school deems test scores a “considered” factor in admissions and releases a middle-50 percentile SAT score range of 1200 – 1450 (I’m using new SAT scores out of 1600, since that is what we will be working with from now on). You may think your 1250 makes you competitive at this school, and it might, depending on the rest of your profile. But remember that this score range is likely pulled down by some students who have been admitted for special reasons. You should always target scores in the upper half of this range, then, to consider yourself to be truly competitive. If you’re wondering how to improve your ACT score or your SAT score to move up in this range, one of the best ways to do so is to practice with all of the official tests you can get your hands on (and do so under a time limit). You can find previously given SATs and ACTs on the College Board and ACT websites as well as in the official books published by these organizations.

The moral of the story is that good test scores can only help you in college admissions. Test optional schools are a great choice for students for whom the SAT or ACT is not a good fit, but, with the state of college admissions today, good scores still stand to open up a lot more doors.

About Kristin Fracchia
As Magoosh’s resident ACT Expert, Kristin creates awesomely fun ACT lessons and practice materials for students. With a PhD from UC Irvine and degrees in Education and English, she’s been working in education since 2004 and has helped students prepare for standardized tests, as well as college and graduate school admissions, since 2007. She enjoys the agonizing bliss of marathon running, backpacking, hot yoga, and esoteric knowledge.

All views and opinions of guest authors are theirs alone and are not representative of the views of or its parent company Nelnet.


Study Habits of the Top 10% of Test Takers Reply

Sure, everyone knows you should study to do well on a standardized test, but what does it take to get a top score? Are there certain study habits that correlate with better scores?
We wanted to find out, so we surveyed more than 400 Magoosh students who scored in the top 10% for the GRE, GMAT, SAT and ACT. Here’s what we learned about the way they prep for test day.

The Big Takeaways

  • Lone wolves get awesome scores. 98% of respondents said they chose to study alone when asked if they preferred to study solo or with a group.Top scorers give themselves enough time to study. 84% of students in the survey studied for a month or longer for their exams.
  • Spending thousands isn’t necessary to get a high score. When asked how much they spent on test prep, 88% of respondents said they spent $300 or less. A majority also reported that they performed better than they thought they would on test day.
  • There’s no need to cram. 71% of respondents said they gave themselves a break the day before the exam instead studying to the last minute.
  • Scores benefit from the silent treatment. When asked if they preferred listening to music while studying, 63% of students said they chose to study in complete silence rather than with any kind of music or background noise.
  • Top scorers do sometimes leave the library. 68% of respondents said they exercised at least 1-2 times a week while studying.
  • It’s possible to score big the first time around. 68% students nailed the exam the first time they took it.

The Survey Also Suggests…

Money doesn’t guarantee satisfaction. More than 20% of students who spent over $500 on test prep said that they felt like they performed worse than they expected they would on test day. In contrast, fewer than 9% of students who spent less than $500 felt that way.
Paying more might actually stress you out. A majority of the students that reported paying more than $1000 felt nervous on test day. In contrast, fewer than 35% of students who paid less than $1000 felt that way.
Your study efficiency might decrease after 6 months. Fewer than 5% of respondents who studied between 1 and 6 months performed worse than expected on test day. That number jumped to 16% for those who studied for more than 6 months.

Most Common Advice From Top Scorers:

  • Once you know how long you have to prepare, develop a study routine and stick to it. Many students from the survey said it was helpful to work a strict study schedule into their daily routines. It helped them manage the workload and spread their study time out evenly across their few months of prep. Magoosh recommends giving yourself 3-6 months of prep time. That’s because studying more than that might burn you out, but anything less than that might mean you’re inadequately prepared for the exam. In addition, make sure you manage your intensity and try not to study for more than 4 hours in a day.
  • Dedicate a significant amount of time to learning from each question you miss. A large handful of top scorers from the survey said that while studying, you should be mindful of the mistakes you make. Try and learn from each and every question you miss, and — above all — avoid rushing through them. Several students also mentioned that keeping a log of their errors helped them learn and move on from each mistake.
  • Study strategically by focusing more on your weak spots. After your diagnostic test, review your answers and identify the types of questions you struggle with most. Top scorers from the survey said that other studiers should make a point to focus on their weak points, then practice those question types until approaching and solving them feels natural. (Don’t be alarmed if you start dreaming about certain test questions after a while.
  • Timing is everything. Knowing how to approach a question is great, but if it takes you five minutes to get to one answer, that won’t help you on test day. The top scorers from the survey said it’s crucial to be able to complete questions accurately under intense time constraints. At the beginning, you should study slowly and focus on developing techniques, but start timing yourself toward the end to prepare for the realities of test day.

This post originally appeared on the Magoosh Blog.

Class Participation in the American Classroom Reply

You might think that perfect scores on tests, homework and projects might be all you need to do well in a university class in the USA, but you’d be wrong and the reason will probably surprise you: you have to participate in class.

Having to participate in class is something that always surprises new international students when they come to the USA.

“The biggest surprise is U.S. education. It’s very strict and you have to ask instructors questions if you don’t understand. You have to participate in class,” said Pirakorn Iamcharernying, from Thailand, who studied in the Intensive English Program at the University of San Francisco in California.

Your first day of class, you will be give a syllabus. Reading through the pages that outline the grading criteria and student expectations the professor has of you, you will see a word that will become very familiar to you while studying in the U.S.: participation.

What exactly is “class participation?” Each professor will have their own definition of student participation and they may even describe it in great detail in the syllabus for their class. Professors will grade on the frequency and quality of your participation in class. Generally, class participation is contributing to class lectures, either with comment or questions, volunteering answers to questions directed at the class and being attentive.

Why is class participation important? The first, most obvious answer is to make sure you’re actually there! You can’t participate in class if you’re not present. Another reason is to make sure you’re listening and absorbing the material discussed in the lecture. Having to answer questions about what is being discussed keeps you attentive. And finally, participation challenges you to understand the concepts and think through them critically.

This is a foundational concept in the U.S. classroom and it is part of the style of teaching here in the states. In the United States, the education system is designed to go beyond memorization. Obviously, you must know the material, but the application of concepts is much more important. There is a reason individuality is an integral part of American culture: it encourages ingenuity. Professors want you to not only hear what they’re saying, but they want you to understand what they’re teaching. You may even be asked to debate with your professor! The idea of arguing with your professor can be very uncomfortable and your first instinct may be that it’s disrespectful. After all, it may be extremely disrespectful in your home country. But rest assured, if you speak respectfully, you probably would not offend your professor.

“I was very surprised when students and the professor argued about some issues in the class. I think this is very good for students to improve critical thinking ability,“ explains Yujeong Moon from South Korea who studied English and business at Angelo State University.

Since an American style classroom and the education system will be all new to you, I suggest observing how American students participate in class and how their contributions are received. Some professors might have a more casual style and allow for open commentary in the class. Other professors may require that you raise your hand and wait to be called upon. Remember, you can always ask your professor for clarification too.

Speaking up in class or taking a chance and answering a question—in front of people, no less—can be really intimidating, especially for an international student and if English is not your first language. But you must try if you’re going to be successful in your studies and the more you do it, the more comfortable you’ll be.

Jennifer Privette is the Editor and Assistant Publish of Study in the USA magazines and She has a bachelor’s degree in journalism from Seattle University.

All views and opinions of guest authors are theirs alone and are not representative of the views of or its parent company Nelnet.

How to Organize Your Summer Test Prep Reply

The summertime is upon us! While every high school student deserves some rest and relaxation, it’s also the perfect time to kick your SAT and ACT prep into gear. With no academic obligations on your plate and a long runway to improve your testing performance, now is the time to start setting yourself up for college success. In this brief guide, I’ll show you exactly how to make the most of your summer and walk into the fall ready to knock these tests out of the park.

Summer Prep Tip #1: Cancel the Cramming and Covet Consistency

The most underrated ingredient in any successful test prep program is long-term effort. You can’t cram for the SAT and the ACT – they test large banks of information applied in unique ways, and they test process more than they test knowledge. If you give your brain the time to develop thick, well-developed pathways for these processes and facts, you’ll have an incredibly easy time tackling these exams.

With that in mind, your focus should be on small bits of steady, everyday effort. If you can put in 20-45 minutes a day throughout the summer, you won’t just be making things easier on yourself – you’ll also be using your brain the way it’s meant to be used. Don’t put off your prep and then try to get in eight hours on a Sunday – instead, try to focus on small, consistent study sessions on a daily basis, and feel free to split them up! If you can do twenty minutes in the morning and twenty minutes in the afternoon, you’ll be in amazing shape.

With that in mind, make sure to pick a program that allows you to study on your own schedule! Most SAT and ACT classes and tutors have somewhat restrictive scheduling limitations, which won’t allow you to optimize your summer prep. Instead, find a way to study that allows you to do small bits of work on your schedule, whenever you have the time.

Summer Prep Tip #2: Make Sure You’re Studying for the Right Test

Things in the testing world have gone topsy turvy. The PSAT is now in the New SAT format starting this fall, the SAT is going to switch in March of 2016, and the most recent versions of the current SAT have had their fair share of problems over the last few months. Fortunately for you, this makes life easier, not harder.

As far as I’m concerned, your best bet is to pursue one of these two paths:

  1. Study for the ACT, which will kill two birds with one stone. Because the New SAT is almost identical to the current ACT, by studying for the ACT, you’ll be able to knock out the ACT, the New SAT, and the New PSAT (I guess that’s three birds…).
  2. If you vastly prefer the current version of the SAT to the ACT, you should study up and take it before it changes in March.

Summer Prep Tip #3: Pick a Flexible Program

Summertime is marked by totally unpredictable schedules. You never know where you’ll be, when, or for how long. With that in mind, it’s essential that you pick a program that works wherever you happen to be, and that doesn’t rely on a set-in-stone schedule. As we already discussed, consistency is key, so choosing a program that accommodates the flexibility of your summer schedule will be essential.

Classroom courses are the worst offenders. If you have to be in a specific place at a specific time week in and week out, you’re setting yourself up for disaster. If you work with a tutor, make sure that he or she can work with you online via Skype or video conferencing software, and be sure that he or she can work on different schedules throughout the summer.

The most flexible way to prep is usually through an online course (a reason why online SAT and ACT prep programs are rapidly increasing in popularity). As long as you have a laptop with you, you can prepare whenever you find the time and wherever you happen to be. All you’ll need is the discipline to log into the program after a day at the lake or the beach (sometimes, it’s easier to study before you’ve been out in the sun all day).

No Matter What, Starting Early is Essential

No matter which program you use, and no matter which test you decide to take, the best thing you can do for your performance is to start preparing today. The longer the runway you give yourself to prepare, the less work you have to do on a daily basis, the more breathing room you have, and the more effectively your brain will be able to retain information. Even if you only put in ten minutes a day, starting now will be the smartest decision you can possibly make!

Thanks so much for reading my guide! Have a great summer, and don’t hesitate to get in touch if you have any questions.

Anthony-James Green is a world-renowned SAT and ACT tutor with over 13,000 hours of experience teaching these tests, crafting curriculum, and training other tutors to teach their own students. Business Insider recently named Anthony: “America’s Top SAT Tutor

All views and opinions of guest authors are theirs alone and are not representative of the views of or its parent company Nelnet.

Important Tips for the Recent College Grad Reply

The late nights cramming for finals is over; you’ve put your cap and gown away…yes, you’ve survived college and it’s time to enter the real world.  Now before you start picking out the Ferrari or the McMansion, the first thing you’ll need to do is find a job.  While you’ve likely taken some type of employment seminar, nothing in the real world is ever textbook.  Below are important tips that I believe every new graduate should follow.

Network, network, network!  Like most recent graduates, your network is likely more limited than those who’ve been in the workforce for several years.  One thing to remember, especially in a tight job market (and even in a great market) is that many times the old adage, “It’s not what you know, but who you know” does hold some truth.  Sure, you still need to be qualified, however it never helps to have someone on the inside.  So how does one network?

  • LinkedIn– not your traditional networking, however this is one social network you don’t want to dismiss!
  • Connect/converse without limits– don’t sell your network short by networking with only those who can help you achieve your goals. Be open, honest and genuine with everyone- it’s amazing how small the world is and karma has a way of coming back to find us.
  • Listen- don’t just listen for opportunities in the ‘now’, listen to what those around you say. What makes their job difficult?  Is that something you can fix?  If you’re able to connect these dots the opportunities afforded to you will be many.

Concentrate on that Resume!  A resume, by Webster’s own definition, is simple- it’s a personal summary.  So why not skip all the theatrics, slap together a few blurbs around your experience and start getting those applications out the door?  The reality is that for each position you apply for, there are hundreds, if not more, other people trying to get the coveted interview.  Now you don’t need to ship your resume off with glitter ink, watermarks and neon orange paper (unless the position calls for quirky or gaudy), however you do need to make sure that the content of your resume is organized in a manner that easy to digest.

  • Styles- make sure the overall style of your resume plays to your strengths. As a recent graduate you will want to focus on the skills and knowledge that you’ve just earned.  A narrative focusing on how those courses and any extracurricular activities relate to the position at hand may be the best way to go.
  • The little things– even the most perfect resume in the world is quickly derailed by spelling and grammar errors. Unless you’ve broke out the quill and ink vial, give the spellchecker a click and then make sure you give it a once over- if possible find another set of eyes to review.  Don’t be that guy…or gal who fails to heed this advice!
  • Customize- unless you’re applying for the same position at the same organization over and over again, you should have more than one resume. In fact, you should make sure that each resume is suited and tailored for each position which you apply.
  • Keywords- make sure your resume is filled with keywords, this will ensure your resume will make it through the applicant tracking system. Often, keywords are simply job titles, skills, certifications and so on. I would suggest making a list of your targeted jobs and review the job posting and make a list of what terms or keywords appear many times, as this will give you an idea of what to use in your resume.

Beyond these tips, remember that even in the greatest of economies it takes time to land that perfect job.  If you’re not getting much traction in the way of interviews, consider using a professional resume writer.  They’re often able to help punch past that first layer and help land the interview.  In the end, remain positive and be persistent as you follow your dreams.


Michelle Kruse has more than 10 years of hiring and recruiting experience and a background in coaching and leadership development. At ResumeEdge, Michelle recruits and hires resume writers, provides training and ongoing support, manages strategic partnerships and serves as a subject matter expert on the job search process.